Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Infrastructure And Education

I have three buildings today, of two uses. The first is one I've passed by on countless occasions. It's one of the hydro substations in the city, located on the west edge of the Glebe. The building's still in use, older than the more recent (and utilitarian looking) substations one comes across on a regular basis. Something about the building appeals to me.


Elsewhere in the Glebe, this is First Avenue Public School. The oldest part of the school dates back to 1898.


And down in Old Ottawa South, this is Hopewell Avenue Public School. Its oldest portion dates back to 1910, and the school had a major expansion decades later. The last shot, taken on another day, shows the expansion as well.


30 comments:

  1. They are serious and historic buildings.

    Tomás.

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  2. Big and strong buildings. Good thing the old buildings are not abandoned or demolished but still in good use.

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  3. That first one reminds me of my high school. Alas, it has now been torn down.

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  4. Old school buildings are so sturdy and hold so many memories!

    Janis
    GDP

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  5. Super sturdy old buildings William.. Built to last!

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  6. @Tomas: they are!

    @Nancy: often buildings like this can be lost.

    @Stuart: my high school appeared to be a product of the 60s.

    @Janis: they do!

    @Grace: indeed!

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  7. They don't build 'em like they used to....

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  8. These each could be the school(s) of my youth. At least my youth in Minnesota. There is one here in Ocala, though, that looks similar to your structures, but it's quite old.

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  9. The schools remind me of the ones I went to when I was growing up. They kind of resemble each other. Built to last and handle all kinds of issues through the years.

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  10. They built some high quality buildings in that time. Today , Our schools are little more than tarpaper shacks that they bulldoze down as soon as they're no longer needed.

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  11. Three big, sturdy buildings! I like the look of that first one too.

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  12. I think it is the little touches of lighter color or brick that is appealing. Like the builders were making their own statement.
    MB

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  13. @Norma: they certainly do not.

    @Lowell: I think in each case, the schools I went to were built in the 60s. There are still some of the old one room schoolhouses around in that area that were long since turned into homes.

    @Bill: these ones certainly have managed a century. I haven't seen a date on the hydro building, but it looks to go back to the early 20th century.

    @Red: they certainly did.

    @Sharon: there's another hydro building west of there, in an area I used to live in. That one made the list recently of a local columnist's outstanding buildings, and with good reason. I should go out there sometime and photograph it.

    @MB: those light touches seem to be on all three.

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  14. Those are schools to be proud of, with windows and dignity!

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  15. what do they call that, federal style, i am terrible with remembering those terms, it looks regal. tall & like important things happen there. ( ;

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  16. You have given us a nice selection of old buildings today. Enjoyed them, thanks for sharing.

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  17. They added such nice details in older times!

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  18. Beautiful, solid old buildings with nice details. We have brick buildings on the west coast but not so many. They don't do well in earthquakes.

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  19. @Cheryl: I quite agree.

    @Beth: the only one of the three that I found architectural style information on was First Avenue, and it's apparently Richardson Romanesque. The other two though seem quite similar to that style.

    @Denise: you're welcome.

    @Linda: yes, they are!

    @RedPat: they certainly did.

    @Kay: that would be a problem. We do get quakes here- there's a fault line in the area, but nothing like the quakes of the Pacific Rim.

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  20. I don't know why, but I mostly like the second building.

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  21. I think I like the hydro sub station best....

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  22. Reminds me of a school here in D.C.

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  23. Old buildings are the best photo subjects and these were great to see, William.

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  24. Strange, the first building looked like my high school in a small Midwestern town. It's been torn down and replaced with something more modern.

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  25. @Jan: each have their merits.

    @Geoff: it certainly doesn't look like its more modern counterparts here.

    @Revrunner: that doesn't surprise me.

    @Beatrice: thank you!

    @Mari: I just wonder how old it actually is.

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  26. I'm happy to see the old school buildings are still there. I went to school in a similar old building, but sadly it was torn down.

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  27. You like those old brick buildings we can't have in California? Brick is not used here-- only for decoration, due to quakes. I like them too.

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  28. Looks like no-nonsense buildings!

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