Saturday, November 18, 2017

New Disorder

The last time I was in the War Museum, the final section was blocked off, as a reorganization of the large space at the end of the Cold War section was underway. It was open this time, starting with an introductory set of panels.


This is a section of the Berlin Wall, given to Canada after the government hosted a conference of foreign ministers in the wake of the events of the fall of 1989 to determine the future of Germany. The graffiti is on the side that once faced West Berlin; there is no such graffiti on the side that faced East Berlin.


Canada sent military assets- navy and air force- into the Persian Gulf as part of the Desert Storm coalition, which is examined here.


Canadian peacekeepers were dispatched into the former Yugoslavia in the 90s. This light utility vehicle came under attack by Serbian forces in Croatia in 1994- 54 bullets hit it, with ten of those hitting the passenger and driver.


Another case of an attack is here. Canadian forces were in Afghanistan from 2001 through 2014 as an active combatant against the Taliban. Afghan insurgents used an IED to destroy the front of this vehicle, which used to stand in Lebreton Gallery. Three soldiers and one journalist were saved by the protective armour of the rest of the vehicle.


This is the typical uniform and equipment being used on patrols by Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan during that period.


This is a portion of a Chinook helicopter from the Afghan conflict. A corporal painted the design onto the helicopter- this is a hockey term, but also references the helicopter's two hooks on the belly for lifting equipment.


The Royal Canadian Legion Hall of Honour comes after one has emerged from the permanent galleries, and focuses heavily on commemoration. One of the display areas focuses on peacekeepers, including a model of the Peacekeeping Monument that stands downtown.


Another item here is the original plaster model for the War Memorial.


The next stop from here is Regeneration Hall, another focal point for the museum's design, pointed squarely towards the Peace Tower on Parliament Hill. Walter Allward's sculptures for the Vimy Ridge Memorial are here.


With some of the Vimy sculptures off in the temporary exhibit, part of Regeneration Hall had space for a different kind of exhibit, a collaborative effort. War Flowers was done by sculptor Mark Raynes Roberts and a specialist in scents, Alexandra Bachand, with museum curator Viveka Melki. Crystal sculptures, photographs dating back to the First World War, and stored scents in various combinations could be experienced with several different examples.

24 comments:

  1. This just gets better and better insofar as information and artifacts go! The sculptures are magnificent. Perhaps we could institute a world-wide law that requires legislators and other leaders to serve on the front lines of any future wars they get us into.

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  2. The cold war was a time of anxiety. Not as awful as a real war, but a drawn-out source of stress. I love those flowers.

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  3. A multisensory museum experience? That's a first for me.
    "New disorder" is a perfect title. It seems to describe much of what's gone on in my lifetime.

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  4. ...the "New Disorder" is in the White House!

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  5. Disorder and destruction...very grim but powerful presentations all the same.

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  6. Hello, I am all for peace in the world. Unlike our president who seems to want to start something with everyone.
    Love the sculptures, great exhibit and museum. Have a happy day and weekend!

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  7. @Lowell: at the very least their kids. Our minister of defence actually was a soldier in the Afghan war.

    @Linda: it was a lot of stress.

    @Kay: most scents were pleasant.

    @Tom: that is true.

    @Christine: thank you.

    @Francisco: thanks.

    @Eileen: I firmly believe that twit will be the author of his own undoing.

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  8. i enjoy seeing the vehicles. the doodle skeleton, not sure what to call him, he is neat design. ( ;

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  9. Awesome part of the museum to visit. Great post.

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  10. The "Newseum" in Washington DC also has a big section of the Berlin Wall.

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  11. A grim title, but relevant. We never should forget fights for freedom! Thank you for showing this. My favorite tribute is the Vimy ridge memorial.

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  12. Thanks for giving us this tour of the museum, William.

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  13. @Beth: the doodle skeleton's a good way of looking at him!

    @Cloudia: indeed.

    @Red: thank you!

    @Sharon: a good spot for it.

    @Norma: it's a good one.

    @Jeanette: you're welcome.

    @RedPat: it's a pleasure. I'm wrapping it up tomorrow.

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  14. A wonderful tour, thank you William.

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  15. Those vehicles display the violence of war.

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  16. That first vehicle looks like my first car, only mine didn't have a floor in the front on the passenger side. The door on that side also had a habit of swinging open every time I took a sharp left hand turn.

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  17. I love the flower sculptures. Beautiful!

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  18. Those vehicles can tell a story!
    You've given us a good tour William, thank you.

    All the best Jan

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  19. @Bill: you're welcome.

    @Catalyst: they do.

    @Revrunner: yikes!

    @Mari: thank you!

    @Tamago: so did I.

    @Jan: you're welcome.

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