Sunday, January 19, 2020

A Path Forward

The second of the three galleries inside Canada Hall concerns itself with the period following the end of the French and Indian War, up to 1914. This particular area deals with everyday life, and so we see tools, furnishings, and other items.


The First Nations experience remains tightly woven into the museum's narrative, and so artifacts are found here throughout. This is an Anishinaabe bag from the mid-19th century depicting a water serpent called Mishibizhiw.


Carrying on, we find items like a sleigh and a bank crest for the Molsons Bank, which operated out of Montreal.


Different sports: cricket, lacrosse, and curling, all represented here by pieces of equipment. Lacrosse is something that comes from the First Nations, having had been played from time immemorial by tribes of the eastern woodlands and some areas of the great plains.


This coat of arms once hung in the Vieux Palais de Justice in Montreal. It dates to the mid-19th century.


Unrest in the Canadian colonies had led to rebellions in the 1830s. Ultimately out of that would come a movement towards responsible government. Robert Baldwin and Louis-Hippolyte LaFontaine were moderate reformers and partners as premiers, smoothing the way for what would become Canadian Confederation.

36 comments:

  1. Canada has had its fair share of conflicts. Interesting about the sports already being played by the First Nations.

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  2. Hello, what a neat exhibit. It is interesting to see the sports items. Enjoy your day, wishing you a happy new week ahead.

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  3. You have to be tough to play Lacrosse.

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  4. ...wonderful artifacts, I love the look into the past.

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  5. Interesting look at the past. Happy that bathtubs have come a long way since then,

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  6. The display in the second photo is really appealing.

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  7. @Sami: lacrosse is unique.

    @Gattina: it stands out.

    @Eileen: thank you.

    @David: that's true.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Tom: me too.

    @Janey: true.

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  8. You do a great job with the photos of the contents of glass encasements. I’ve always struggled with those.

    The sleigh is quite something!

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  9. I was interested in the water serpent, Mishibizhiw, and wonder if he's related to Nessie in Scotland. I also wonder how you say his name! I'm into dragons these days in my clay sculpting!

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  10. Wonderful Artifacts There - Way Cool

    Cheers

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  11. I enjoy seeing "every day items" from these past eras. It's fascinating.

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  12. I hope that there is a section that shows the tools and technology our ancestors had to use to build the country.

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  13. I didn't know lacrosse was a First Nations game. I learn a lot from your posts. :-)

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  14. It’s interesting to see what they used in everyday life.

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  15. Great exhibit of 'everyday' articles then ~

    Happy Moments to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  16. Youhave some interesting exhibitions there

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  17. I specially like the old cradle and the spinning wheel in the second photo

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  18. It looks like a fine museum.

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  19. @Anvilcloud: I agree.

    @Jennifer: thanks!

    @Marie: sometimes I have issues.

    @Barbara: water beasties are a thing in many parts of the world. The nearest one to here I can think of is in Lake Champlain.

    @Padre: thank you.

    @Sharon: that it is.

    @RedPat: definitely.

    @Red: there are examples of that throughout this area.

    @DJan: yes, it's been played for centuries here.

    @Marleen: it is, yes.

    @Carol: thank you!

    @Bill: I think so.

    @Jan: me too.

    @Jack: it is.

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  20. Beautiful artifacts, a wonderful exhibition.

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  21. I'd sure like to visit this part. Very interesting to me.

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  22. So interesting to look back like this William, life was so different but the political problems will always be present, then , now and forever!

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  23. The sleigh and carvings are beautiful. Quite a contrast with today, the art put into signs and such.

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  24. At last, something I can speak to. In the second photo, a wonderful overshot coverlet. It will be made of handspun wool yarn. It is two panels, sewn together. The colors will be reversed on the opposite side; the blacks will be whites and the reds will be whites.

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  25. I like to visit the past as well. Thanks for the opportunity. A visit to the ROM is long overdue. It has been a while...

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  26. Interesting artifacts. I didn't know that we can thank the First Nations people for Lacrosse.

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  27. Very interesting exhibits. Would be interesting to see how these people live and the tools they used.

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  28. Interesting. I enjoy seeing the First Nations displays.

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  29. @Bill: indeed.

    @Happyone: to me too.

    @Grace: that's true.

    @Maywyn: indeed.

    @Joanne: I figured someone would comment on that.

    @Catarina: you're welcome. I haven't been to the ROM in years myself.

    @Kay: the rules were formalized in the 19th century, but played for countless centuries before that.

    @Nancy: it is indeed.

    @Linda: I do as well.

    @Tanya: indeed.

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  30. I love museums that show rooms. and that carving on the coat of arms is remarkable.

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