Saturday, March 14, 2020

Life Upon The Tundra

Like the Arctic Hare, the Arctic Fox also shifts colours from summer into winter.


Some of its prey can be seen here: lemmings and the Arctic Ground Squirrel.


Here we see the Willow Ptarmigan.


And the Snowy Owl.


A wider view gives us more mammals, both on land and at sea, such as the caribou, the beluga and narwhal, and a seal.


This unusual looking bird is a King Eider.


These are thick-billed murres, birds that nest on steep cliffs and dive as deep as 300 metres into the ocean for fish and other prey.


Today I leave off with items made from animals and other sources in the North.

33 comments:

  1. Interesting animals from the Artic. Happy weekend!

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  2. ...the tundra has always sounded like a harsh place to live!

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  3. The animals are so cute, but I don't like the items made out of these poor things !

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  4. Hello, wonderful exhibit. I would like to see all this wildlife! Enjoy your day, happy weekend!

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  5. @Nancy: thank you.

    @Tom: true.

    @Sandi: definitely.

    @Gattina: that's understandable.

    @Eileen:thank you.

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  6. The winter coats and plummages are quite wonderful.

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  7. I enjoy seeing your museum tours. Thank you for the tundra lesson. :-)

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  8. Interesting post, William !
    The King Eider is totally new to me.

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  9. It really is amazing how they have adapted by changing colors!

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  10. Nice post with wonderful shots, that snow owl is a magnificent bird.

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  11. I was surprised how small the arctic fox is.

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  12. Lovely sharing of museum displays. Thanks

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  13. I've seen an arctic fox and they were so small. I like the snowy owl, very impressive.
    Thanks, William!

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  14. Hi William, the Willow Ptarmigan is incredible with it's transitional plumage. The King Eider is a strange looking bird. Thanks for an interesting exhibition. I trust you're safe and well. Jo

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  15. Nice photos. The King Eider looks like a puffin gone Gothish.

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  16. @Anvilcloud: they are indeed.

    @DJan: you're welcome.

    @Karl: it's quite a bird.

    @RedPat: it is indeed.

    @Jan: I agree.

    @Red: that's true.

    @Barbara: you're welcome.

    @Bill: a pleasure to show these.

    @Jo: at the moment I'm fine. Lots of things going on here in response to the current situation, however.

    @Lea: that it is.

    @Maywyn: it does!

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  17. To see a snowy owl in the wild--what a treat that would be.

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  18. Some more great photographs here William, thank you.

    All the best Jan

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  19. Lovely historical 'critter' display but rather they be in the wild ~

    Happy Moments to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores

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  20. Interesting to see all the animals.

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  21. Amazing nature well documented.

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  22. Loving this trip William, museums have always fascinated me. How clever the animals and birds that change colour in winter, perfect camouflage 💙

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  23. Snowy owls are beautiful. Every few years they have a big southerly migration and we get some here. They are diurnal so it's easier to see them.

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  24. I love seeing all the animals but to see them stuffed breaks my heart.
    You have wonderful places to visit.
    parsnip

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  25. @Revrunner: it would!

    @Jan: you're welcome.

    @Carol: true.

    @Jenny: it is.

    @Happyone: I agree.

    @Joanne: they are.

    @Magiceye: thanks!

    @Grace: that's true.

    @Kay: we see them here.

    @Parsnip: not at the moment- our national museums have all closed up for at least a couple of weeks.

    @Whisk: thank you!

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  26. Love these museum trips! I suppose that King Eider is where eider down comes from?

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  27. Love the arctic foxes and ground squirrels:)

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