Sunday, March 15, 2020

The Passage Of Time

Banners at the top of a display area show that the Arctic wasn't always a place of ice and unforgiving terrain. Dinosaurs lived here at one time.


Over time, different types of animals lived in this area as the climate fluctuated.


The contemporary period is one of long winters and short summers. A polar bear is mounted here.


Right across, however, is the fossil of a High Arctic Camel, which was in the region 3.5 million years ago.


First Nations peoples have been carving items out of the rocks for generations, and in the contemporary era have made a living at it. This reflects that style with a contemporary touch: Hunter With Snowmobile And Sled is a 2011 carving by Ottokie Aningmiuq.


The last of the overhead banners brings things into a more recent era.


Two different animals, extinct since the end of the ice age, appear in pictures.

28 comments:

  1. My post this week features the passage of time ... but not in this scale.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Every year, a few polar bears get to Newfoundland on icebergs from the Labrador Sea. Encounters with the always make the news.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello, great exhibit. I think there will be many more animals become extinct in our life time. Enjoy your day, wishing you a happy, healthy new week ahead.

    ReplyDelete
  4. It must be scary to have these dinosaurs roaming around those days.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice exhibition. I find it fascinating to think and dream about the world in several eras.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Gosh I hope man will not join the exhibit of endangered species.....stay well.

    ReplyDelete
  7. @Joan: I'll look for it.

    @Marie: for good reason.

    @Eileen: thank you.

    @Nancy: it would be.

    @Jan: me too.

    ReplyDelete
  8. The changes over the ages are hard to believe.

    ReplyDelete
  9. It is amazing to see the changes in climate through the ages!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Climate change has happened on this planet before.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Gosh, I never knew there was jungle on the arctic!

    ReplyDelete
  12. @Janey: thank you.

    @Red: that's true.

    @RedPat: it is, yes.

    @Sharon: and will again.

    @Barbara: long, long ago.

    @Whisk: it is, yes.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I had never heard of an arctic camel before, I'm pretty sure.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Dinosaurs in snow is diffict to imagine because I think of them in the tropics. Polar bears and wooley mamouth ok in snow though.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Fascinating! That last picture shows a creature I cannot even imagine.

    ReplyDelete
  16. A great exhibit, love the polar bear.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I could never imagine a camel in arctic!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Wonderful historical post and photos ^_^

    Be well,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

    ReplyDelete
  19. Given the way that climate change is taking place the Arctic may start to look like that again.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Amazing to know that Arctic wasn't always as cold as it is now and had a great variety of wildlife.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Your new header makes me excited for spring.
    It's amazing to imagine some of the creatures that once walked over our lands. It's hard to imagine a camel in northern Canada.

    ReplyDelete
  22. It's an interesting way to organize them museum. It's really quite amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  23. The polar bear exhibit looks as if it is smiling:)

    ReplyDelete