Tuesday, February 16, 2021

A New Start

A reminder to members of City Daily Photo: the theme for March 1st is Mirror. 

Across from the area I showed yesterday is another reproduction, featuring two ancient feathered dinosaurs that reinforce the connection between those creatures and birds.


I mentioned a few days ago how the Museum had a scavenger hunt theme with birds placed into unusual places in each gallery. Such is the case at this location, entirely appropriate given the dinosaur-bird connection: a display case with two cardinals, added to the display.


Moving along, this area begins to explore the end of the age of dinosaurs and what came after. A movie theatre here (closed because of Covid) shows a film about the asteroid collision that ended the age of the dinosaur. What came afterwards were the survivors, especially the mammals.

This is a reproduction and fossils of an early horse. Much smaller than its contemporary.


This reproduction features small mammals scurrying around the bones of a dinosaur skull- something that must have been a regular occurrence in the aftermath of the dinosaur extinction.


Tomorrow we'll pick up here, with the gradual evolution of some mammals that took to the sea.

32 comments:

  1. Eohippus! I always liked that name and the idea of a very small horse.

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  2. A very small horse would be a delightful thing. They used to have a show for miniature ponies at a riding school near here, some of them were very tiny indeed.

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  3. What an interesting post, William. I have never thought horses were anything but as we know them today. Likewiser, I never knew there were "feathered" dinosaurs and the connection between them and birds. Thank you for sharing. Thank you for always commenting on my blog posts. Have a great day. Jo

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  4. I still stay with the dinosaurs and I'm sorry this chapter is over!
    The damned asteroid collision ... ended the life of my friends! LOL

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  5. I think that several quite small races of horse are still in existence. There is the familiar Shetland Pony, of course, but if I am not mistaken there are even smaller breeds too.

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  6. @Linda: and this one is the size of a cat.

    @John: I've seen some miniature around the size of a mid sized terrier.

    @Jo: thank you!

    @Ella: yes, but if not for that, we probably wouldn't exist.

    @David: yes, there are some.

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  7. Interesting to see the developments in those panels.

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  8. The evolution of the horse is fascinating.

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  9. ...the natural world has always been complex.

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  10. There are still miniature horses around. These are fascinating creatures to me. :-)

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  11. That horse display reminds me of a TV show I saw on PBS about the origins of the horse. Very interesting.

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  12. Brilliant! I was just thinking thank goodness 'Night at the Museum' is just a movie 😉

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  13. Fun idea and neat photos ~

    Moment by Moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  14. @Jan: it is.

    @Marie: I agree.

    @Nancy: indeed.

    @Tom: it has.

    @DJan: this one's smaller though.

    @Sharon: I'd enjoy that.

    @RedPat: that it is.

    @Grace: thanks!

    @Carol: thank you!

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  15. There is a ridge near where I live that is full of dinosaur tracks, especially stegosaurus tracks. This part of Colorado once had a large sea and the tracks were made in the sand of the shore. It's fascinating to think of all these large creatures roaming where we now live!

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  16. What a beautiful museum! I'll bet kids love that place - so fascinating.

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  17. The horse evolution is very interesting.

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  18. The scavenger hunt is a great idea! And that's quite the set of teeth!

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  19. It's very interesting to see the evolution of the animals ! The biggest "Dragon" we have now is a lizzard !

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  20. Reminds me of the documentary I saw recently on PBS about the horse.

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  21. Interesting thought, tiny mammals in dinosaur skulls.

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  22. @Pat: there are a lot of fossils to be found in our Canadian west as well. A legacy of millions of years ago when things were quite different.

    @Susie: there were actually a couple of kids in one of the shots from yesterday with their parents. They were animated but quite well behaved.

    @Bill: I think so too.

    @Jeanie: it is a good idea.

    @Gattina: the biggest lizard I can think of is the komodo, which is one you don't want to mess around with.

    @Revrunner: I'll have to look for that documentary.

    @Maywyn: well, from their perspective, why not?

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  23. Interesting to see the evolution of the horse. Such wonderful creatures.

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  24. The early horse looks more like an ass.

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  25. My wife would have loved to have a horse that small as a pet ... I don't think the dog would like it, though.

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  26. I love the feathered dinosaur and the early horses are fascinating:)

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  27. Cool exhibits. Yes, they are impressive stuff to dream and muse on, William. Have a sweet day, my friend

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  28. some one should have gone to the dentist ...look at those teeth. wow! ( ;

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