Monday, July 22, 2019

Contact

800 years ago on Baffin Island, this Inuit man lived and died. In collaboration with the local community of Arctic Bay, researchers reconstructed his appearance in a full sized model, and replicated some of the artifacts he was found with. He has been given the name Nuvumiutaq.


The first confirmed contact of Europeans into the New World took place a thousand years ago with the Vikings. First Nations peoples first encountered their ships as the Norse under Lief Erikson made landfall and brief settlements along the east coast of Canada. L'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland proves their presence here, and there have to be other places.


The Vikings didn't stay long, but centuries later the French and the English would make their own crossings into the New World, and their presence would be a permanent one.

27 comments:

  1. To imagine the "new world" would not have come to the Inuit - how would they live like today?

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  2. Eine interessante Geschichte.

    Noke

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  3. He could never have imagined that his story would be perpetuated in this way.

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  4. Great exhibit, the first settlers were brave people. Enjoy your day, wishing you a great new week!

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  5. I like that one life was highlighted and imagined, even giving the man a name. Another interesting exhibit. :-)

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  6. ...contact wasn't a good thing for native people.

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  7. What a great display! I wonder if his name has a meaning in Inuit?

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  8. This is an excellent exhibit. It’s a great way to learn and kind of helps put our life today into perspective .... we just need to live the best we can while we’re here ...and realize we’re just a blip in time.

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  9. L’anse aux Meadows is a great place to visit.

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  10. It makes me wonder what he would think if he could see that image.

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  11. Looks like a very interesting exhibit. I love learning about other cultures and the history of people.

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  12. An intriguing display, William!

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  13. They must have been resourceful people to survive so long in such a climate. Catchy name that, Nuvumiutaq.

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  14. An interesting exhibit, William.

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  15. Such cool history well shown. I admire the first nations of the north and their skills!

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  16. @Iris: it would be very different.

    @Italiafinlandia: that's true.

    @Noke: thank you.

    @Francisco: thanks!

    @David: that's true.

    @Aritha: it is.

    @Eileen: thanks.

    @DJan: thank you.

    @Tom: unfortunately true.

    @Barbara: in this case it's a placename, but a good one.

    @Sallie: I agree.

    @Marie: I'd love to see it.

    @Sharon: he'd be astonished.

    @Likeschocolate: me too.

    @RedPat: that it is.

    @John: quite true.

    @Bill: it is.

    @Cloudia: thanks!

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  17. The skill and fortitude it took to live his life is amazing.

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  18. the history ... very cool. always a fan. can you believe how quickly the weekend flew on by. silly weekend. needs to stick around more often .. i wish. take care. ( :

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  19. We've flown over the Baffin region several times. It looks very cold and harsh.

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  20. And they all didn't live happily ever after.

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  21. You always have the most interesting post.
    parsnip

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  22. Fascinating, I'm always amazed at how facial features can be discerned and replicated from a skull:)

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  23. Love recreation of the Inuit ~ today ~ their art is fascinating ~

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  24. Courage of first settlers is amazing.

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