Friday, July 26, 2019

Red River Rebellion

Here are two takes on one painting. Canoe Manned By Voyageurs Passing A Waterfall is an 1869 oil painting by Frances Anne Hopkins.


The Metis people are a specific mix of First Nations and white descent who created a unique culture of their own, much of it in the West. By 1885, tensions with the federal government led to action between the two sides in what became the North-West Rebellion.


Among their leaders were Louis Riel and Gabriel Dumont, seen here.


Today Riel is deemed a Father of Confederation, certainly the father of Manitoba, and yet his life came to an end with a treason conviction and a hanging. These are the cuffs used on Riel to lead him to the noose.


The items in this display case- hat, scarf pin, and totem pole, are all the work of Haida artist Charles Edenshaw.


I leave off for today with what I'll have in more detail tomorrow: a church right in the midst of this space.

30 comments:

  1. Never heard of that rebellion so I must read up on it some time. Look forward to seeing the little church

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  2. Learning a lot of history through you!

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  3. Thanks for helping us understand the history of your land.

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  4. A passage of history not so well-known to many.

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  5. It is a fascinating chapter of the country’s history

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  6. Despite the reflection in the painting, it is a fine work depicting a lifestyle that was an integral part of early Canada. As for the execution of Louis Riel, he was a political victim not a legal victim - and what a price he paid.

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  7. ...rebellions and treason have always been parts of history.

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  8. I hope some of the unique culture is still there...
    The hat is beautiful.

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  9. i love the canoe, the hat and what a cool church. what a great day!! here comes the weekend, i know i am ready, hope u r 2. have a blast. ( ;

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  10. Hello, love the painting and neat reflection. It look like a great exhibit. Enjoy your day, happy weekend!

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  11. Thanks for making me so much more aware of the history of the area. Thank you! :-)

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  12. @Bill: it's quite a story.

    @Pat: that's part of what I do, after all.

    @Joan: you're welcome.

    @Italiafinlandia: true.

    @Marie: that it is.

    @Francisco: thanks!

    @David: that's true.

    @Tom: that is thecase.

    @Iris: thank you.

    @Beth: thanks!

    @Eileen: so do I.

    @DJan: you're welcome.

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  13. I love the way you feature so much about First Nation history.
    Is seems like that first painting is getting way too much light. Or, is it just an illusion?

    Janis

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  14. What wonderful shadows on your last two photos of the church.

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  15. Is that the real church that they have brought there - I will have to tune in tomorrow!

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  16. Such fun to see here, and imagine there. Yes, would love to see the paintings without reflections...but alas, not to be by the way they are displayed.

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  17. the North west rebellion was a very sad part of our history. It didn't have to happen.

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  18. I'm learning a lot, William, thank you.
    Nice church !

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  19. Nice little church tucked in there. Look forward to hearing about it.

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  20. Thanks for the history lesson about things I knew nothing about. The little church looks intriguing.

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  21. Thanks for the history lesson, William.

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  22. @Janis: it's the glass that has that effect.

    @Sharon: thank you!

    @RedPat: yes, it's the real church.

    @Barbara: that has to be.

    @Red: it did not.

    @Karl: you're welcome.

    @Happyone: it's a lovely part of the museum.

    @John: it's quite a building.

    @Bill: a pleasure to do so.

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  23. I never knew Canada had that rebellion. Tweeted.

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  24. More interesting history. Isn't it interesting that a person can go from a pariah to a revered figure?

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  25. Fascinating, look forward to more on the church:)

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  26. Your photos capture history so well ~

    Happy Day to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  27. MOST interesting and informative!!! "The Metis people are a specific mix of First Nations and white descent who created a unique culture of their own, much of it in the West. By 1885, tensions with the federal government led to action between the two sides in what became the North-West Rebellion."

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  28. I never heard of this before. Very interesting!

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  29. I've learnt a lot of Canadian history thanks to your blog, William.

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