Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Canadian Cuisine

I promise, this blog is not going to turn into a foodie blog.

I've shown you one of these huts on the Rideau Canal before. This is a permanent location for Beavertails in the Byward Market, across from the market building itself. The business was started, and is still run by, an Ottawa Valley family whose fried dough treat has caught on well here and has become an institution, particularly during Winterlude. The dough is shaped like a beavertail, fried up, and coated in various ways. There are franchises around the country, and temporary huts set up for festivals and other special occasions here in Ottawa and Gatineau. When President Obama first came on an official visit in February 2009, he picked up a Beavertail here, and the treat has been served at the Canadian embassy in Washington during the last couple of inauguration days (note to Marylanders and Virginians: keep that in mind for the next inauguration).


Here's one of them, with cinnamon and sugar.


Another Canadian staple for a cold winter day? It's a dish called poutine. It might look awful, but it tastes marvelous. There are variations in the recipe, but basically it consists of fries, covered with cheese curds and gravy. It's a filling lunch or dinner. I had this over at Dunn's, a restaurant also in the Market.


38 comments:

  1. The beavertail looks scrumptious. Poutine I tried in Québec and did not like...

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  2. One night on our way to dinner, we drove by several food trucks in an empty lot. One of them was a Canadian food truck... serving Beaver Tails.
    Since it was an impromptu food convergence.... I will have to hunt down the truck and send you a photo. And of course try a Beaver Tail and if they have it Poutine.

    cheers, parsnip

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  3. YUMMY ! I like both . Thanks for sharing .

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  4. I'll bet on a cold day those are a good way to warm up.

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  5. I think I gained 2 kilos just reading this William :) the beaver tail pastry sounds divine!

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  6. Oh that beavertail looks so delicious! I would gobble it down! There's a food truck opening here soon that will have poutine on its menu and I can't wait!

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  7. I'm not Michelle would have approved. :-)

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  8. And not a calorie in sight anwhere! :) A fried beavertail does not whet my appetite. Actually that's true of any kind of beavertail! Amazing how a business like that can get started. I'll be it does taste good, though.

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  9. Jane: Yummy! Thinking about food, talking about food, preparing food and eating food is a passion of mine! I enjoy high energy food in moderation at the time it is eaten and over time. Enjoy your high energy cultural foods!

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  10. i will let my people here in virginia know about beaver tails :D they sound yummy! we eat chili cheese fries here...take some fries, top with chili and grated cheddar cheese, yum! then my kids dip it in ranch dressing...if you want to go all out, add some bacon! very low fat of course ;) i love hearing about what others eat!

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  11. @Ciel: the beavertail's beyond scrumptious!

    @Parsnip: I'd suspect it was probably a mobile for some special event. There is an outlet or two in Colorado, as far as I know.

    @Country Gal: you're welcome!

    @Stuart: they certainly are!

    @Grace: I wondered what kind of reactions I'd be getting out of this post!

    @Tamera: you should be giving it a try!

    @Revrunner: well, we'll make sure Michelle doesn't fine out.

    @Lowell: they taste very good.

    @Jane: thank you!

    @Tanya: that sounds good too!

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  12. I thought those were chili cheese fries. I'd certainly try it with gravy instead. The beaver tail looks delicious too!

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  13. What's wrong with a foodie blog?! ;) I tried my first Beavertail in Halifax last summer, and I have to say, I was a bit disappointed after all the hype. I've also never been a fan of poutine, mostly because I don't like gravy and soggy fries. Hopefully I won't be deported.

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  14. Tasteless stodge and disgusting goop...and that's saying something, considering I was brought up on British food!!
    Jane x

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  15. They've started to sell poutine at our local Trader Joe's supermarket! The beavertail sounds very similar (though shaped differently) to a very popular, Portuguese-imported dessert we enjoy in Hawaii called malasadas (which pretty much means badly cooked...except it's delicious:)

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  16. Looks wonderful William, getting hungry now.

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  17. Specially the last one looks very tasty.

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  18. Well, you've certainly introduced me to some new culinary treats!

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  19. Now I want a beaver tail. I'm probably the only Canadian to never have tried poutine. Deb

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  20. @Krisztina: I'll have to try chili cheese fries sometime.

    @Norma: you should!

    @Carla: well, this is a photoblog, after all. And I'd have to be deported too...since I never go into Tim Horton's, which is practically Canadiana personified.

    @Jane and Chris: though mind you, some good English pub grub hits the spot...

    @LondonLulu: I'd like to try that!

    @Luis: that was the idea!

    @Afanja: it certainly was!

    @Sharon: if you're ever up Colorado way, there's an outlet there...

    @Deb: you should correct that post haste!

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  21. Your Beavertails look like our Elephant Ears usually seen at Fair time. As for the Poutine--a curiosity but willing to try. MB

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  22. Oh I forgot to tell you----I follow a blog from a gal in Alaska and they have a ice carving festival going on now. Her blog is http://akelaine.blogspot.com/
    MB

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  23. Your Poutine and the Beavertails look great to me, and I will definitely be on the look out at the next presidential election.

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  24. I have to admit that I have tried neither of these dishes but they sure look tasty!

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  25. Wish we had beavertails down here!

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  26. They both like very tasty, especially the Beavertail.

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  27. Not sure how I typed "like" but I meant "look"!

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  28. @MB: I've heard of elephant ears before in terms of a treat. And thanks for the link!

    @Denise: hopefully the company goes down again to the embassy.

    @RedPat: if you're up in Ottawa sometime, you should give them a go. I'm not sure if they're in Toronto... though I do know they've got something in Barrie.

    @Cheryl: you'll just have to try one if you're out here some time.

    @Lois: I didn't even show one with a chocolate spread... I should have gone with that!

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  29. My husband would have loved that dish with gravy on it. Of course, he liked anything with gravy on it. The Beaver Tails look like a spiffed up version of Indian fry bread.

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  30. These are all new to me but I'm game to give them a try.

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  31. I love bread and can't think of anything except oysters that I don't like fried so the beaver tails sound very good. The second dish, well I'll just have to take your word for it.

    I'm visiting because I read your comment on Denise's blog, looked at your profile and decided you must have something interesting to say. And you do. :)

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  32. Well, I have never tasted Poutine, but I do love to try new foods. The beaver tails? Oh, yes, I do love sugar and cinnamon.

    Bises,
    Genie

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  33. Living in Quebec since I was born, I am very familiar with poutine, William, and I agree with you, it is very good!

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  34. @Mari: I can't recall hearing of Indian fry bread...

    @Jack: I wonder if there are any poutine places in Hartford. I know it's starting to show up in places in the US.

    @David: thank you!

    @Genie: sugar and cinnamon are a great combination.

    @Linda: it's practically a Canadian institution, nowhere more so than in Quebec.

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  35. I've yet to taste either of these but if had to choose, it would be the beavertail!

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  36. I'm so relieved that you are not eating real beaver tails.

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  37. "Beavertails" are a part of our Polish culture up here in the Valley! Many of the old granny's made them, but Grant Tinker really amped them up!

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