Sunday, September 27, 2015

In Memory Of The Marathoner

One of the temporary exhibits at the Museum of History at the moment deals with Terry Fox, the Canadian who lost a leg to cancer, and set out on what became the Marathon of Hope, a crossing of Canada from east to west in 1980. Running an average of 42 kilometres (26 miles) each day, he captured the attention of Canadians. His journey ended east of Thunder Bay as the cancer that had taken his leg had returned and spread to his lungs. He died the following year. The exhibition space here is filled with images of the Marathon of Hope, shirts, shoes, and socks Terry wore, both his regular and spare artificial legs, the support van driven during the journey by a friend and Terry's brother, Terry's journal, and examples of the outpouring of support from the public he got during the run and in the months afterwards.

34 comments:

  1. I just saw a Terry Fox movie...I think it was last week! He was a great guy and very unselfish.

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  2. I recently heard a piece about Terry Fox on National Public Radio (it may have come from Canadian Broadcasting). He was quite an inspiration and well worth memorializing.

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  3. Wonderful stuff, thanks for sharing!

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  4. What a wonderful person and a nice tribute to him with this exhibition.

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  5. Great post. Incredible what people who are disadvantaged can challenge themselves to do.

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  6. What an incredible person! He must be hope and inspiration for so many people, especially those who are touched by cancer. Thank you for sharing this!

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  7. What a great series of photos today. Perseverance is an amazing thing.
    I posted on a museum exhibit about a man, today, too! Happy rainy, Sunday. Is it rainy in Ottawa?

    Janis
    GDP

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  8. Interesting and inspiring post about a great man!

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  9. I guess I'm the only Canadian who truly wonders why he did what he did! When you contract cancer you have to do something different, if you can: to change the pattern of the cancer cells. Running for election killed Jack Layton, I think. I would want to spend time with family, if I had cancer, and this journey of Fox's really mystifies me.
    You need to let your body boost your immunities, not abuse your body. Hubby has been on boosters since we visited the naturopath. His cancer cell production has slowed down, but it will kill him.

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  10. This must be a display that would bring some emotion as it takes you directly to Terry Fox. We will never forget him and the courageous marathon he attempted. The real marathon is what he left us...a never ending fund raiser.

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  11. What a great memorial for this brave guy!

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  12. Hats off to him. A more than deserved memorial.

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  13. What a brave man and an inspiration to us all. Thank you for sharing his story.

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  14. @Linda: he showed incredible will power.

    @Kay: it wouldn't surprise me if NPR borrowed an item on him from our CBC.

    @Whisk: he was!

    @Blogoratti: you're welcome.

    @Marianne: reading his journal entry for me was particularly affecting.

    @Pat: the fact that he got through each day is a tribute to his will.

    @Tamago: having had lost too many people to that disease, he's definitely an inspiration.

    @Janis: it is a very pleasant sunny Sunday afternoon here. Great weather!

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  15. @Nancy: he was quite an inspiration.

    @Jennifer: I think it comes down to the individual. He felt he needed to do this, and so went out and did it.

    @Red: he left quite a legacy in the world.

    @Sharon: it certainly is!

    @Jose: he's well respected in our history.

    @Birdman: it would have taken incredible willpower to do what he did.

    @Denise: you're welcome.

    @Revrunner: indeed.

    @Norma: very much so.

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  16. wow, such determination. i am glad he is remembered as a great inspiration.

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  17. A curious and interesting memorial!

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  18. It makes me teary seeing these displays! He was a real hero.

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  19. What an amazing guy, most of us are so lucky and don't appreciate it enough...

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  20. Great tribute to this man and his impressive story.

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  21. very cool. i am always amazed by folks who have artificial legs. is that what you call them? they have such courage & a determination to keep on going. so cool! ( :

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  22. What a guy and what a story! I can't imagine running 26 miles much less running 26 miles day after day! And with cancer, yet. Lois was a runner: she ran the NY Marathon in 2003 and the Disney Marathon a couple of years later. She ran and won numerous races (in her age group) in Florida. I took photos!

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  23. What an inspiration he was. Sad to have lost such a courageous young man.

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  24. His passing has caused more people to participate the walk for Terry.

    Marvelous . His Mom must be so pleased over the years. So sad she loss him to the terrible disease. Cancer.

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  25. @Tex: he is quite an inspiration.

    @VP: I found it very moving... everyone knows someone who's dealt with the disease.

    @RedPat: he certainly was.

    @Geoff: he had incredible strength of will.

    @Jan: coming in here, there's a video loop playing of him on the run. It's a bit haunting to hear the sound of his footstep, very different with a prosthetic.

    @Mari: I certainly think so.

    @Beth: yes, artificial or prosthetics. They've come a long way with that technology since Terry's day.

    @Lowell: just in training for the run, he already amassed enough miles to cross the country before even starting.

    @Janey: he left an incredible legacy behind.

    @Jackie: definitely!

    @Carolann: his family can be proud.

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  26. Terry Fox was amazing. I'm pleased to know he has been remembered in the museum.

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  27. Never heard of that one would hope that now here would have had a better chance of living longer. Some people can achieve some amazing feats and should be remembered

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  28. I remember Terry Fox's run very well. He had a lot of grit and determination. His running helped many people to understand disabilities in a new way.

    BTW, I like your new banner photo.

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