Thursday, December 17, 2015

The Art Of War

This is the passageway leading up out of LeBreton Gallery back towards the main lobby, turning at a sharp angle up at the top. The walls here are adorned with large murals of war art, both the ferocity of the battlefield and places away from the front. That also includes, of all things, nose cone art from planes, painted during the Second World War era.

32 comments:

  1. I really like the way that first picture was shot.

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  2. Your first two photos are my favourites in this series. :)

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  3. Really enjoyed this post! Nose art is a fascination of mine, William

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  4. This museum is very entertaining and interesting.

    Tomás.

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  5. Looks like a good place to visit. I like the 'art'.

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  6. I love looking for the horizon line in that first photo. I'd love to be in that hallway!

    Happy Thursday, William!

    Janis
    GDP

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  7. Looks like a great museum to visit William.

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  8. Wonderful collection. I specially like the first two photos.

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  9. I love the humor in that nose cone art.

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  10. It would be very interesting to spend a whole day in this fabulous museum!

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  11. @Whisk: thanks!

    @Linda: thank you!

    @Cloudia: some of these ground crews back in the day painting these had quite an imagination! It's good that these ones were saved.

    @Tomas: I quite agree.

    @Pat: there's a lot of war art here, scattered through the museum, as well as in the vaults- there's a painting of the Vimy Memorial at night surrounded by ghosts that must be in the vaults at present for a rest.

    @Janis: thank you!

    @Luis: it really is.

    @Jan: thanks!

    @Norma: thank you.

    @Sharon: so do I.

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  12. They had the right idea with this art but it's places to high for a good view. There were many great war artists and and airplane decorators.

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  13. very cool. i always enjoy planes. like that they kept them for pieces of art. for others to enjoy. ( :

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  14. The passageway looks such a beautiful space. Those art works are wonderful!

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  15. The art on the fighter planes is always exceptional. Bless them boys.

    As you know--Cows gotta be center stage--they're looking at you.
    MB

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  16. @VP: I have spent whole days in this museum!

    @Red: I think in this case it works best when you're there on site. The murals are quite large, so giving them a high placement on the wall works well for presentation. Regardless, you do have to look up! There was an exhibit here awhile back on two war artists, one Canadian and the other German, that I liked.

    @Beth: fortunately they were preserved!

    @Tamago: thank you, I agree!

    @Revrunner: it can have that feeling, if viewed from the vantage point I chose.

    @MB: thanks!

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  17. The more I see of this building the more I like it. The perspective on top is impressive.

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  18. I would love to visit this museum, so many interesting things to see.

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  19. The art works are beautifully displayed on the walls. Smiled about the idea of nose cone art. Willie the Wolf is very creative.

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  20. The passage is an interestingly oppressive architecture which I think is fitting. There are a few nice works there too...

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  21. Nice passageway. Lots of interesting things to see there.

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  22. Such great art produced amid all that chaos...

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  23. Great architecture, and some of the images / paintings are very good.

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  24. @Jose: I'm finishing up tomorrow with some external views.

    @Nancy: there really are.

    @Tex: thank you!

    @Gemma: it makes me wonder where the Willie the Wolf motif originated!

    @Ciel: I do think the architectural style perfectly fits the concept of the museum.

    @Marleen: indeed!

    @Geoff: Canada continues to have a program that goes back at least to the First World War, of war artists, spending time with the military. There is an artist who works at the Rectory Art House that spent time in Afghanistan during the years our troops were there, for example.

    @Gunn: I think so too.

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  25. And all those who gave their lives and now lay buried in forgotten places say "Amen." It is very interesting and very sad.

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  26. I agree with Lowell. Very interesting and very sad.

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  27. I think I could spend a lot of time in this part of the museum. It's fascinating.

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