Wednesday, January 25, 2017

A Creative Streak

The Castle Of IJsselstein is an oil painting from 1648, by the Dutch painter Jan van Goyen, depicting the castle along the IJssel River near Utrecht. Yes, the double capital at the beginning of both the village name and the river is accurate- the Dutch alphabet has an extra letter composed of the two letters, with a Y sound when it's used in words. I know, it's confusing.


Here we have an early oil painting from Rembrandt van Rijn, The Tribute Money, painted in 1629. Rembrandt depicts the passage from Matthew 22 in which Christ deftly deals with a trap set out for him by telling those who are challenging him "to render unto Caesar what is Caesar's, and render unto God what is God's." The painting is an early example of Rembrandt's long fascination with the use of shadow and light in his work.


This oil painting is by another Dutch artist, Meindert Hobbema, done circa 1670. Two Water-mills captures a favourite subject for the artist, whose career was relatively short, with most of his work done by this period. He preferred the natural landscape, and while this has the look at first of an English countryside, it's a Dutch location. The two watermills in the painting appear to have two different purposes, as a flour mill and sawmill, and when you start to really look at it, you start noticing people in the scene. One of the docents in the galleries was by this painting, and we chatted at length about this one, and the others nearby. 


The Return Of The Prodigal Son is an oil painting done sometime between 1665-69 by the Dutch artist Jan Weenix. It presents the New Testament parable in a theatrical way, with the artist's familiarity with Italian landscapes incorporated into the work.


This portrait is by Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens, titled simply Head Of An Old Woman. It is a study painting done in one sitting around 1615; Rubens meant for it to be source material for incorporating into other paintings, usually as part of a group.


A Dutch artist, Peter Lely, painted this, The Countess Of Meath, around 1674. Lely was active in Britain, serving as a court artist for Charles II. This painting captures Elizabeth Lennard, wife of the Earl of Meath, in a formal portrait, one that also incorporates Roman imagery- the arrow alludes to Diana, goddess of the hunt.


A Midsummer's Afternoon With A Methodist Preacher is a 1777 oil painting by Philip James de Loutherberg, a French artist in the court of Louis XV, who settled in London in the early 1770s. This painting is a mixture of influences- the French and Dutch fondness for landscape art with English moralizing and caricature.

37 comments:

  1. Dutch paintings have a recognizable look, don't you think? Good photos taken in what was no doubt low light conditions.

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  2. Wow just seen that cover photo of yours, we have just had a cold spell but never like that. They are some great old paintings you showed

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  3. These paintings are all so lovely. But, I must admit, I am especially fascinated by the early Rembrandt. He did like a dark mood in his paintings.

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  4. A lot of Dutch in your post today. In Amsterdam I used to live with my parents close to the Jan van Goyen quay. I passed it every day on my way to school.

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  5. A nice array of paintings today.

    Janis
    GDP

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  6. I am really impressed with the variety you have shared. I do like the windmills landscape. It does remind places near where I live here in England.

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  7. The old masters are so intense, I think of the paintings shown here William I like Two Watermills best.

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  8. @Linda: thanks!

    @ODP: I never use flash with art, though next time I plan on trying another setting.

    @Bill: thank you!

    @Gemma: he did!

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Marianne: the Gallery does have quite a number of Dutch work.

    @Janis: thank you.

    @Lauren: it was an enjoyable painting to examine closely.

    @Grace: these artists had great talent!

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  9. i like the Head of an Old Woman. she looks like a great one to know, friendly, kind, ( ;

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  10. I would love to view these beautiful paintings too. Have a great day!

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  11. incredible paintings...amazing to me that someone can make something so realistic with a paint brush!

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  12. Thank you secondly for your shows of such clear paintings for everyone.

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  13. Not my favorite art but I realize its significance. I'm surprised so much of it is here.

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  14. I tend to be drawn to Flemish and Dutch paintings. I'm especially fond of Vermeer. Whenever I travel, I look to see if there might be a Vermeer in the local museum.

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  15. @Karl: definitely!

    @Beth: she must have been quite a character. Rubens tended to do these in a single setting and incorporate them into other scenes- she might have been used for domestic staff in a painting, for example.

    @Nancy: thank you!

    @Tanya: it's beyond me.

    @Cloudia: you're welcome.

    @Carolann: I love to spend time here.

    @Red: I tend to feel the same way about Picasso. There is a lot here!

    @Sharon: I had a look- we don't have a Vermeer.

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  16. What marvelous paintings. There's so much to see in each of them. I could spend hours in this place!

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  17. Great painting here as also in previous post.

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  18. What a great collection, William. I have enjoyed watching your photos!

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  19. That is a great collection, William. Thanks for the tour!

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  20. Que coleção espetacular,os quadros são belíssimos, William
    Um abraço

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  21. A wonderful collection of paintings from the masters. Thanks for sharing them with us.

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  22. Grace has the right word: intense!

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  23. Interesting. I didn't know about Rembrandt's "The Tribute Money" or "A Midsummer's Afternoon. . ."

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  24. @Lowell: I've certainly spent hours!

    @Orvokki: thank you.

    @Marleen: I enjoy showing them.

    @RedPat: you're welcome.

    @Gracita: thank you.

    @Bill: it's a pleasure.

    @Norma: indeed!

    @Revrunner: apparently there's another Rembrandt here. I'll have to look for it next time. I've probably seen it walking through before.

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  25. A nice collection and visit to the gallery.
    Wendy

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  26. Ah, to wander around a museum with that type of art. The Phoenix Museum might have one to four, but never so many. Thanks.

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  27. They are all absolutely stunning. I could spend hours in there just staring at them!

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  28. I like The Head of an Old Woman though The Countess of Meath is a close second.

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  29. I do like that Rubens. It's certainly fine for just a "study" painting.

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  30. Love these incredible works of art.

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  31. Wonderful tribute to the great Dutch masters, William.

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  32. The Countess of Meath looks like an interesting painting. The landscapes are a bit hard to see. I will have to see them in person some time.

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  33. I like the smile on the third to last one,

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