Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Fallen Of War

As I am in the midst of this series, have a look at my writer's blog today, where I have a post on the ongoing series of embassy events here called Ottawa Welcomes The World.

Here are more views within Lebreton Gallery at the Canadian War Museum. Some of the heavy vehicles allow for views inside, so you can see just how cramped they can be. I have been inside some of the current equipment at a military race weekend held here in the fall- these are still not built for comfort!


Heading up from the gallery back towards the main lobby, the walls have large war art paintings mounted for viewing. That also includes nose cone art, which tended to be quite popular during the Second World War.


There was another painting hanging in a spot that I noticed when I arrived. The Flag was painted in 1918 by John Byam Liston Shaw. It was first exhibited to Canadians in 1919, and resonated strongly with families who had lost sons, brothers, husbands, or fathers during the First World War. Grief is conveyed in different ways among the onlookers, while the fallen soldier, Red Ensign, and lion sculpture represent the country and empire for which so much blood was shed. Viewing this painting, I was quite impressed with its heartbreaking power and poignancy.

22 comments:

  1. Memories of war always brings a feeling of sadness. Have a good day!

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  2. If only we could get rid of war, then we wouldn't need memorials like this. But unfortunately, war is big business... :(

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  3. I need to get in on Ottawa Welcomes the World.
    I cannot get that last picture out of my mind- the reality of war.

    Janis
    GDP

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  4. The machines of war are so huge and terrifying sometimes. Love the artwork; it's amazing.

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  5. ...I've always found nose cone art to be interesting!

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  6. neat canon ... different style than what i have seen. need more close-up's though. ( ;

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  7. Hello, I love the artwork. The painting with the flag is my favorite. Have a happy day!

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  8. @Nancy: thank you.

    @Halcyon: unfortunately.

    @Janis: it is quite a painting.

    @Mike: me too.

    @Tom: as have I.

    @Beth: that is more old fashioned.

    @Eileen: mine too.

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  9. Love the nose cone art.. the painting is spectacular William, it would have evoked many poignant emotions I'm sure.

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  10. A very powerful post! Thank you so much for sharing, William!

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  11. The last photo certainly brings up sadness and the enormous loss of life.

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  12. Oh wow, that painting is very moving.

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  13. The paining is wonderful, William.

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  14. Amazing exhibits and that last photo cropped of the very moving painting, is so evocative.

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  15. The painting is pretty impressive, lots of emotion.

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  16. I like the tank. And painting is beautiful.

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  17. @Grace: I took a look around- it had the same reaction with someone else online some years back.

    @Linda: you're welcome.

    @Red: it certainly does.

    @Sharon: this is one of those times when the artist just captures things perfectly.

    @RedPat: it really struck me, looking at it. Art can do that, from multiple eras and genres. I get the same feeling from Alex Janvier's Morning Star, though in that case, the feeling is one of uplifting.

    @Denise: the painting really impressed me.

    @Bill: Shaw really got that one right.

    @Klara: the next time I'm in, I'll have to photograph the German weather station that's down there. It's been awhile. It's one of my favourite artifacts in the entire museum.

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  18. The nosecone art was usually the pinup girl. They also used the end flaps of smaller plans (that had been damaged) to frame photos of a loved one who was shot down.

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  19. Those are formidable pieces of equipment!

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  20. Tanks! Collin will love this....

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  21. That last painting is indeed very impressive and powerful.

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