Thursday, July 20, 2017

The Castle

The Canadian Museum of Nature was a popular spot on Canada Day, and it was my second stop of the day. I approached from the west, where the glass lantern can be seen contrasting with the architecture of the rest of the building. At the moment, a jellyfish sculpture is hanging inside.


The architecture here is a marvel, inside and out. Galleries are organized by theme, with a new gallery on the fourth floor as well as a gallery for special exhibits. The galleries on lower floors are dedicated to rocks and minerals, water, birds, mammals, and fossils.


When visiting, I usually work my way from the top floor down. This view is from within the glass lantern, which was added in renovations that were completed in 2010 when Queen Elizabeth was here to re-dedicate the building. It replaces an original stone tower that was once here- the architect, David Ewart, ran into a problem with the soil beneath the tower that required the removal of the bulk of it.  Today the glass is a good contrast to the beauty of the rest of the building, offering good views out into the city. It has officially been named the Queens Lantern, honouring both Queen Elizabeth and her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria, for whom the museum was first built as a memorial.


This is a hint of what I'll be showing you tomorrow. It's that new gallery space I was mentioning. 

31 comments:

  1. Marvelous! It is so stately on the outside yet glamorous inside.

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  2. The interior is unexpectedly light and bright. I love the views you've presented us. And the preview is intriguing!

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  3. The views inside are spectacular.

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  4. Hello, it is beautiful inside and outside. A nice tour! Happy Thursday, enjoy your day!

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  5. ...a nice blend of old and new.

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  6. It's amazing how well the Queen's Lantern fits in with the original museum building, the views are fabulous from there!

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  7. @Linda: it certainly is.

    @Kay: it's a wonderful building.

    @Sussi: definitely.

    @Marleen: they are.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Eileen: it is quite a building.

    @Tom: indeed.

    @Grace: I wonder what Ewart would think of the Lantern.

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  8. I like the way you arranged the order of the photos. You are such a great researcher and historian, William. You invariably include interesting and historical information in your posts.

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  9. I like the high ceiling in the entry which. I didn't expect,

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  10. It's beautiful and amazing, and I love the high ceiling and aerial view!

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  11. I remembered the high ceilings but forgot about the interior center that goes up all the floors. It's always a spectacular building from the outside.

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  12. So big and impressive. Both the exterior and interior are beautiful! Have a great day!

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  13. I can see that huge jellyfish in your second shot! That is a very impressive building.

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  14. @Kate: thank you!

    @Janey: it is quite a dramatic central space.

    @Linda: I do as well.

    @Red: you would have visited this place when the Nature side of things shared the building with what's today the Museum of History. Quite a difference over time!

    @Nancy: it is quite a building.

    @Sharon: it really is!

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  15. Lovely building, and it looks more modern inside.

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  16. Cool castle, and psychedelic final shot, William!

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  17. Beautiful building. I see jellyfish sculpture. It looks so cool! :-)

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  18. That atrium is wonderful, William!

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  19. I especially love that last shot!

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  20. What a lovely building and some beautiful views.

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  21. @Orvokki: the lantern's quite modern in its sensibilities, but not in a way that's clashed with the building. The architecture firm that headed up the process has a very good reputation for working with heritage buildings. I think that while the galleries themselves have changed over time, the basic bones of the building aren't that different from where things started a century ago, particularly when you look at period photography.

    @Cloudia: that last spot was quite popular!

    @Tamago: it's a wonderful museum.

    @RedPat: it certainly is.

    @Norma: so do I.

    @Bill: it's a great place to visit.

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  22. That one photo looks like an octopus swallowing the building.

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  23. Impressive place and I am looking forward to your next post.

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  24. i guess i was asleep yesterday ... sorry about that William ... actually made a run to town and completely forgot my comments that i needed to make ... love the show where you see the stairs in the window ... i immediately think of harry potter and the moving steps ... so cool! great for pic taking. ( :

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  25. A lot of beautiful photos in this post.

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  26. Our kids went to the UK and saw some real castles. It was exciting!!! (They posted 660++ photos!!!)

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  27. Interesting posting. I look forward to more.
    GOD HELG / HAPPY WEEKEND to you.

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  28. Big glass window and people on the stairs look great. Good capture.

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