Monday, July 10, 2017

A Finale For Doors Open

Earnscliffe is a photographer's dream from the outside. It is beautiful inside too, though photography inside is not allowed. John A. Macdonald died here in 1891 in a room on the second floor, a room that today is largely preserved as it was. It was the passing of a man who, among all of our Fathers of Confederation, was the driving force of it all. It's a fitting home for Britain's top diplomat to Canada, and not that far from work- the High Commission is near the National War Memorial and the National Arts Centre.


It might well be a very English thing to tend to gardens, and the grounds here are well seen to. This statue always seems to catch my eye when I visit.


This view looks out onto the river, with Gatineau on the far shore.


There was an outdoor tent set up for tea, which included a table set up for a shop, Jacobsons, that happens to be nearby and sells British goods.


I contented myself with taking more exterior shots of the residence, which was a busy place, before going inside. Thus ends this year's Doors Open series. I hope it has been enjoyable for you.

29 comments:

  1. Those British goods look wonderful!

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  2. It was a very pretty series of buildings to watch.

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  3. ...and all good things come to an end!

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  4. Beautiful facade and grounds!

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  5. Schönes Gebäude und eine schöne Grünanlage am Haus.

    Noke

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  6. @Linda: I thought so!

    @Marianne: I enjoyed presenting them.

    @Marleen: indeed!

    @Tom: that is true.

    @Francisco: thanks!

    @Halcyon: I think so too.

    @Noke: thank you.

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  7. The English really do know how to do a good garden ☺ It's been a super series William, you have encouraged me to make more effort when we have Doors Open here!

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  8. An enjoyable series indeed, William, thank you !

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  9. It's a beautiful house and an equally beautiful garden. I would have been tempted by those British goods.

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  10. Hello, it is a beautiful house and a lovely garden. Pretty statue and a great tour. Happy Monday, Enjoy your day and the new week ahead!

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  11. A wonderful programe to share the treasures! Thanks William

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  12. @Grace: I must not have remembered it being an idea in Australia. I know some cities in the United States do it, from the odd blog I've seen. And Museum Night in Europe is rather similar in its concept.

    @Karl: it's been a pleasure to show the series.

    @Sharon: I'll have to go up to Jacobsons the next time I'm out that way. I think I must have passed by it when I visited Beechwood Cemetery.

    @RedPat: it certainly is.

    @Eileen: thank you!

    @Cloudia: you're welcome.

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  13. As I said before there's lots of history in this place. I learn history easier if I can see it.

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  14. Beautiful building. Have a beautiful day!

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  15. i love the water fountain, love all the white trimmings. so so pretty! happy week! ( ;

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  16. That statue and the greenery catch my eye. Maybe I'm British!

    Janis
    GDP

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  17. @Red: it's a wonderful place to visit.

    @Nancy: thank you!

    @Beth: so do I.

    @Norma: it's a good fountain.

    @Janis: possibly!

    @Revrunner: it is.

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  18. A gorgeous building. I love that fountain.

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  19. A series of open doors? How delightful. You could also have a series of open windows to go along with your series of closed stained glass. 😎

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  20. A shame that the interior was off limits to cameras.

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  21. Earnscliffe is such a lovely place - both building and structure. The building looks like our neo-Gothic style building in Dromana known as Heronswood.

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  22. Absolutely stunning, William. Excellent photos.

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  23. That's a wonderful building surrounded by a beautiful garden.

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  24. Lawns look British too :) You know what is the secret of British lawns beauty? All you have to do is cutting and watering them... for three hundred years...

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