Wednesday, August 12, 2015

A Three Headed Dog

The 100th Regiment Of Foot is a historical re-enactors group here in the Ottawa area who have taken their name from a regiment that served in the Napoleonic wars and was disbanded afterwards. Many of the original members settled in what is now Richmond, near Ottawa, so it's a fitting connection. The group today takes part regularly in community events and has been doing demonstrations here at the Ottawa Locks during the summer on the weekends. I have photographed them before.


One of the people I spoke with was a member of the Anishinabe people here in Eastern Ontario and Western Quebec. She had a number of items out on display from their usual quarters up near Maniwaki, on the Quebec side of the river. It's been quite a long time since I've been out that way.


Another display was from the Goulborn Museum, which is out in Stittsville, a town southwest of the urban core (and which has connections to the modern day 100th Regiment of Foot). The artifacts include chainmail from the days of mounted cavalry meant to protect the shoulders from a sabre blade.


A more recent global conflict is reflected in this item, a take on the Greek guardian of the underworld, the three headed dog Cerberus. It's an item from the Diefenbunker, a Cold War museum in Carp, west of the urban core. The bunker is a holdover from the bad old days, meant to be a fallout shelter for government leaders if the Cold War ever got hot. When the facility was decommissioned by the government, it came into the hands of locals who turned it into a museum about the era. 

34 comments:

  1. Great displays! This seems like a really wonderful and interesting event.

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  2. Interesting event I would enjoy visiting.

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  3. Great things to see on the event and the flee market.

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  4. They have these re-enactments at Fort York in Toronto as well. I especially enjoyed seeing the drum and fife band. Did they have one here?
    You've also shown some "interesting" artifacts!

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  5. Historical re-enactors, I like the name and what they do. I think we have them in Holland, but I am not sure, Each village does have what is called 'schuttersgilde' where people in ancient costumes march with music.

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  6. Chain mail--how many times do you see that these days? :-)

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  7. Love re-enactors and love seeing the artifacts.

    Janis
    GDP

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  8. You are showing us a really curious and interesting assortment of images!

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  9. looks similar to the character in the Harry Potter movie? i love the kayak or canoe. i did ask the hubby once how you tell the difference between them ... can't recall. i guess i need to do a bit of research & lock it into my head-o. i always wonder what it would be like to walk in those ice shoes. it sounds like Canadian folks use them often. with all the snow you guys get each year. ( :

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  10. That red uniform would look good on me. The 3 headed dog... ah loved that mythological reference.

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  11. We have a Pacific War museum in Fredericksburg, and there are frequent re-enactments of events from that time in a park near the museum. Very interesting to watch.

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  12. Looks like you have found quite a number of interesting items there.

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  13. @Kay: it was!

    @Lauren: I certainly enjoyed it this year.

    @Marianne: indeed!

    @Halcyon: yes, they did have drums, and these re-enactors feature in tomorrow's post as well.

    @Peter: I've heard of such places in the Netherlands.

    @Revrunner: there's an artisan I know of in a small city a couple of hours away from here who works in chainmail as her motif.

    @Janis: thank you!

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  14. @VP: this particular holiday really appeals to me, in terms of the history aspect to it.

    @Beth: yes, it does! I know they used a Cerberus critter in the first book and movie. I loved reading about Greek mythology growing up, and the idea of the guardian of Hades appealed to me. Kayaks tend to have a largely enclosed top, so you just slide your legs inside. They also tend to be smaller than canoes. And I have been on snowshoes. It takes a bit of time to get used to them, but they're very handy.

    @Sharon: me too!

    @Birdman: it's oddly fitting in a museum that was originally set for a doomsday scenario.

    @Linda: I'd enjoy visiting that museum in your area.

    @Nancy: I did, yes!

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  15. If the three headed dog is anything to go by the fallout shelter would be pretty fascinating to see William, have you seen it?

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  16. I love the items from Maniwaki, Quebec, William! Even though I live in Quebec and have seen many parts of it, it is so big that there are still many areas I haven't yet seen, and one of them is Maniwaki! Thanks so much for sharing, love all the things in your photos. :)

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  17. People who do re-enactments deserve a big pat on the back. for many people history becomes more meaningful.

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  18. Anishinaabe beadwork is so beautiful!

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  19. So love the craftwork and such an interesting display of pieces of history.

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  20. Oooh! I wish I could be up there!

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  21. i like the items from the native people.

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  22. Great stuff, I really like the first picture. These reenactors ae usually very interesting people and very knowledgable on their subject...

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  23. @Grace: I have been in the Diefenbunker, a couple of years back the last time. It's a fascinating place. I'll have to go again. I think many people have seen it in part- among the films they've done there was Sum Of All Fears. There's a sequence where Morgan Freeman and James Cromwell are descending into a bunker- that was shot there.

    @Linda: Maniwaki is a place I have to get up to again sometime soon.

    @RedPat: so did I.

    @Red: they certainly deserve it.

    @Orvokki: thank you!

    @Norma: thanks!

    @Marleen: they're well kept.

    @Ciel: I think so too!

    @Gemma: thanks!

    @Cheryl: I thought you'd like it!

    @Tex: I thought it was appropriate to photograph them.

    @Geoff: I was speaking with a man who was manning the table for the re-enactors, and we had quite a chat. He was very knowledgeable.

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  24. I would love that and to see those displays. Thanks for sharing :)

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  25. I really liked that last with the ceramic three headed dog.

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  26. Love the uniforms and crafts!

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  27. I've never seen chain mail for protecting shoulder blades before. Fascinating!

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  28. The native goods and the historical items are pretty interesting.

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