Saturday, August 22, 2015

The Guard

I am doing some posts for several days around the vicinity of Parliament Hill. The Changing Of The Guard ceremony takes place here during the summer, from the end of June to the end of August, promptly at ten in the morning. Two units, the Governor General's Foot Guards and the Grenadier Guards, march out onto the lawn. One comes from behind the East Block, taking the part of the Old Guard. The other marches from the Cartier Square Drill Hall a few blocks away, coming up onto the Hill to take part as the New Guard. There are narrators speaking in English and French to explain the process to onlookers. The military bands play music, the troops are in formation, inspections of the line are made. On a hot, humid day like this one was, military medics are on hand just in case one of the Guards collapses in the heat (it happens). Tomorrow I'll show you their departure en masse from the Hill.


A reminder to members of City Daily Photo: the theme day for September is Curiousities.

35 comments:

  1. l can see people falling over due to the heat. And I think it's at Disney where the characters have to walkabout, with a human, incase the character tumbles over.

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  2. It looks like quite a spectacle ("spectacle" in a good way).

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  3. It's great that you have these old traditions.
    The event is full of interest drama and impressiveness.

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  4. I am so glad we have kept up with some such interesting traditions for centuries...great learning for the new generation!

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  5. Quite a display! I love the red uniforms, but they must be sweating in the summer heat!

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  6. Does this takes place every day? That is a lot of ceremony but a nice show to watch.

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  7. These red uniformed guards are very spectacular! But they have to bear the discomfort of the heat and sweat.

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  8. Luv the big drum, but I'm glad I'm not the one carrying it. :-)

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  9. Quite a spectacle William, the red and black uniforms look brilliant as they march in formation.

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  10. That's impressive. I feel for those guys having to deal with the heat. I don't do so well in the heat either.

    I'm off on "vacation" for awhile (until October!), so my comments may be a little sparse. Anyway, I'm not ignoring you... just traveling.

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  11. It looks a lot like the London ceremony!

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  12. When we went to see the ceremony it was a stinking hot day and several poor guys fainted.
    Jane x

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  13. So regal, and what a contrast to yesterday's post! Love it.

    Janis
    GDP

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  14. The sky has a bit of an 'English' look to it. The difference - your guards are marching on grass. I may be wrong but my recollection here in England is seeing guards march on gravel.

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  15. i can imagine those uniforms are hot!

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  16. Those bearskin hats will do it every time! Now I've never seen a bearskin hat worn in the winter? These ceremonies are very colorful and full of meaning

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  17. @Whisk: the soldier in fatigues that appears in a couple of the shots was a medic- he had a red cross on his left arm, and there was a bag left with a stretcher- you can see the bag in one shot here. They're watching very closely throughout the ceremony.

    @Kay: it's quite a ceremony to watch.

    @Orvokki: it is something that started with the British. I'm glad we've kept the tradition.

    @Siddhartha: it certainly is!

    @Tamera: not to mention those bearskins they wear too. I don't envy them on hot days.

    @Marianne: yes, every day during that period in the summer. I took some shots barely a half hour ago of them heading up to the Hill. I think this will be their last week- they're quartered at Carleton University during the summer, and there'll be time soon for the residences to be readied for student occupancy.

    @Nancy: and we've had our share of humid days this summer. Today, fortunately, is more pleasant than it was that day.

    @Revrunner: I'm glad I don't have to tote it!

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  18. @Grace: they certainly stand out in a crowd.

    @Stuart: enjoy the vacation!

    @Sharon: a lot of the same traditions and rituals go into it.

    @Jane and Chris: I was surprised on the day I took these that none did- at least none that I noticed.

    @Janis: quite a contrast indeed!

    @Lauren: here it's done on the Hill. They also spend most of their day at Rideau Hall, on smaller sentry posts for an hour at a time. I've taken pictures of that, and it'll be forthcoming down the line.

    @Tex: very hot!

    @Red: I knew I wanted to photograph this ceremony so that my readers could get a look at the proceedings. It's fascinating to watch.

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  19. I wish we could have sound with these photos!

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  20. Another ceremony I'd love to see! Even with the heat!

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  21. I can't imagine wearing one of those hats in the heat!

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  22. I feel like I'm in London!!!

    Don't remind me please. I'm drawing a total blank for the theme...

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  23. All great images. This part of Ottawa is lovely.

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  24. @Marleen: I actually recorded video, but strangely the images never showed, just the sound.

    @Cheryl: the heat's a killer!

    @VP: very much so.

    @RedPat: they must be happy by the end of the day.

    @Ciel: I've already got mine set, just haven't written the text.

    @Jack: thank you!

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  25. I love the uniforms. Makes me think of the Mounties!

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  26. Wonderful display I'm sure plus the stirring sound of a military band..

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  27. Amazing that the ceremony has continued. What did they do in the old days when the marchers collapsed? Maybe we don't want to know.

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  28. Always so colorful! Great photos!

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  29. I love the uniforms, but I bet they were hot in them. :)

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  30. The red jackets pop in these photos. From a distance, this uniformed brigade looks like toy soldiers.

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  31. Such ceremonies encourage national pride.

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  32. This is a fun ceremony! I love the bright red of your pohotos!

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