Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Creativity

Countess Tolstoya is a formal oil portrait of a Russian noblewoman done in 1796 by Elizabeth Louise Vigee Le Brun. A French artist and friend of Marie Antoinette, Le Brun fled France at the start of the Revolution and spent her time abroad continuing her work.


The Bridge At Narni is an 1827 painting by the French artist Camille Corot, depicting an ancient Roman bridge.


The Waterfalls dates to around 1872, and is an oil painting by the French artist Gustave Courbet, one of his final landscapes before seeking asylum in Switzerland.


I took this perspective of a corridor off the main gallery.


Rue de l'Hermitage, Pontoise is an 1875 oil painting by Camille Pissarro depicting the quiet town near Paris where he was living.


Claude Monet painted Jean Pierre Hoschede and Michel Monet On The Bank Of The Epte around 1887-90, showing his step-son and son near their home in Giverny. 


Coming out of the world art area, I came into a temporary exhibit showcasing the Canadian artist James Wilson Morrice. Winter, Montreal is the title of this work. Morrice painted this between 1905-07, influenced by his time abroad but bringing it home in terms of his subject.


Le Havre is a 1909 painting by Morrice showing an idealized version of the location- the lighthouse, for instance, was a lamp post in reality.


I finish this tour with a final view of the Christmas tree that was in the glass tower at the time.

33 comments:

  1. Delightful art! I think the first one is my favorite of these.

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  2. Countess Tolstaya is such a fine example of how a the placement of white paint really impacts a work of art. I love it!

    Janis
    GDP

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  3. ...thanks goodness for creative people.

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  4. @Linda: it's quite a painting.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Lauren: thanks!

    @Janis: she really stands out in the gallery.

    @Tom: indeed!

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  5. I am familiar with some of these but from books only. It is lovely to see them here.

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  6. I like the beautiful frames used for framing the beautiful paintings.

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  7. The first one is my favorite too, but they are all beautiful. I love the old frames.

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  8. Hello, lovely collection of paintings. Happy Wednesday, enjoy your day!

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  9. We are fortunate to have such a collection of fine art in our gallery.

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  10. @Marie: the Gallery has quite a collection.

    @Nancy: they're well chosen, often works of art in their own right.

    @Lois: I agree.

    @Eileen: thanks!

    @Red: definitely!

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  11. Neat series of photos ~ great way to spend the Winter ~ inside with Master Artists

    Happy Week to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  12. The first one is my favorite too, William.

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  13. Superb landscape paintings & what a beautiful Christmas tree!

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  14. cool ceiling, love the waterfall and the lighthouse. nice!! creative. ( ;

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  15. It has been a super tour William, lots of fabulous art.. I think the Monet is my fav in this group.

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  16. Does anyone else wanna run up and down in their
    socked feet, on that long floor?

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  17. @Carol: it certainly is. For the photographer museums are a blessing in the winter!

    @Karl: they had a major retrospective of her works here a couple of years back. She was an amazing artist.

    @Christine: it was quite a tree to behold!

    @Beth: thank you!

    @Sharon: I do too.

    @Grace: The Gallery has several Monets. I always like to see them.

    @Whisk: I suspect the security guards and docents wouldn't approve!

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  18. You know what I think I like most about these beautiful works of art? The frames! Those fancy frames are a work of art themselves.

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  19. I like your perspective shot---one of the first things I learned in art class
    MB

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  20. It seems I've heard of Le Brun before. And the Russian noblewoman may have been my aunt. Or not. I know for sure she wasn't my uncle. I do like all of these paintings, and there are some by famous artists which I've not seen before. Like the Monet. Funny about the lighthouse, too. Sure beats a lamp post.

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  21. @Jenn: they certainly are.

    @MB: it's a good idea.

    @Revrunner: his works are well worth seeing, and the Gallery has a few of his.

    @RedPat: definitely!

    @Lowell: I've featured this Le Brun before. When the Gallery had a retrospective of hers, they also had a book come out with her works. I've got that book, and she really was a great artist.

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  22. What a great display of beautiful paintings. I can't pick a favorite, I like them all.

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  23. Such beautiful paintings, thanks for all the photographs William.

    All the best Jan

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  24. I'm truly sorry to see this tour end.

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  25. I like today's selection. Thank you.

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  26. A wonderful collection of paintings!

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  27. Empty corridor looks interesting.

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  28. Definitely the right title for this post!

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