Monday, October 15, 2018

Raven And Moon

The path at MosaiCanada continued into an area of First Nations culture influenced topiaries. This first set was new. Raven And Moon Masks is the title, and it recreates two works of art. On the right is The Raven And The Light, based on the 1992 work of Haida artist Lyle Wilson, a nod to legends in which the raven brought the light of the morning star to humans after stealing it from a spiteful chief who was hoarding it. On the left the topiary recreates The Moon Mask, a 1995 work by Tony Hunt Jr. of the Kwakiutl First Nation. That work relates to the ceremonial telling of the story of the full moon in opposition to the half moon.


Across the path we have another one you might remember from last year. Wisakedjak And The Creation Of The World is based on the Anishinabeg vision of how the world came to be. The creator, Kichi Manito, destroyed what had come before by flood after animals had fallen to fighting amongst themselves. His son Wisakedjak told the surviving animals that one of them would have to dive deep beneath the waters to retrieve a clump of earth so that plants could grow again. The muskrat succeeded in the effort, the earth was placed onto the turtle's back, and the world began again.


Born With The Sun is the title of this topiary. Artist Christine Sioui Wawanoloath was behind this work that concerns itself with the First Nations idea of zoanthropic beings- those combining animal and human traits. That kind of metamorphosis presents itself in the canoe, while birds fly past.


Today I leave off with two perspectives from the other side of Wisakedjak.

39 comments:

  1. They are beautiful. I could spend hours admiring and photographing the topiaries.

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  2. The raven and moon are show stoppers!

    Janis
    GDP

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  3. I'm glad you made a profile photo of 'Raven And Moon Masks', that gives an extra dimension.
    Today's other topiaries are wonderful, the flying ducks are almost magical.

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  4. Schön die kunsvollen Masken und auch die anderen arbeiten.

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  5. There must be any army of gardeners creating and designing all of these incredible features for you all to enjoy.

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  6. @Nancy: I've certainly enjoyed my visits.

    @Maywyn: that they are.

    @Stefan: definitely.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Janis: that they are.

    @Jan: I thought it was appropriate to feature different angles on the pair.

    @Noke: thanks!

    @Tom: it is!

    @Rosemary: there's a lot of work that goes into it.

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  7. Absolutely beautiful! They are all wonderful creations that I would not have known about without your posts. Thank you! :-)

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  8. More amazing pieces! Thanks for showing us all of this beauty, William!

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  9. Fascinating stories. this is a could way to publicize the stories so more people know about them and have some understanding of aboriginal culture.

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  10. Wow, these are just amazing. I think the canoe is my favorite in this group of photos. Enjoy your day and have a great new week!

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  11. Wow, great works of the gardeners !

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  12. A story told in topiary, how incredibly fantastic! I recognise part of your header shot here William ✨

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  13. O.M.G.! That is so incredible! Absolutely amazing!

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  14. @DJan: you're welcome.

    @RedPat: a pleasure to do so.

    @Red: that's true!

    @Eileen: thanks!

    @Karl: I agree.

    @Grace: yes, she's there, and I've got more of her over the next two days.

    @Sharon: and I've enjoyed showing it every step of the way.

    @Catarina: I do think so too.

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  15. Canada looking better every day! But I gotta stay here in the struggle for the soul of USA

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  16. I am amazed by the variety in these works, today and what you showed before. Beautiful!

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  17. more amazing works. I think masks are my favourite this time.

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  18. It must be incredible to see these in person. Wonderful, beautiful, creative works.

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  19. The raven always make me think of Edgar Allen Poe.

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  20. It's just so impressive, and so much to see.
    Great photo's again, thank you.

    All the best Jan

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  21. Raven and the moon are awesome ~ Love the First Nation stye ~

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  22. @MB: so do I.

    @Cloudia: it shouldn't take too long. The floor's falling out from beneath Agent Orange.

    @Marleen: thank you!

    @Klara: they do look beautiful.

    @Catalyst: I certainly agree.

    @Bill: I enjoyed seeing them.

    @Revrunner: I can see that.

    @Jan: you're welcome.

    @Carol: thank you!

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  23. I cannot imagine doing one of the flower sculptures. Pieces of art, every one!

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  24. The First Nations legends are beautifully shown in topiary form! I have enjoyed each post from this event but this may be my favorite just because I always love these legends. The raven or crow is important in every Native American culture I think. Our youngest son told us about the series of fantasy novels he reads in which the earth is built on the back of a giant turtle. I didn't even know that the author's idea was based an ancient legend!

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  25. How wonderful, I've never seen so many topiaries all together:)

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  26. Marvelous and I looked up the story of the Mother Earth: The Legend Of Aataentsic story. Very interesting I must say. Thanks William :)

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  27. Impressive story told by impressive topiary.

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  28. guess those are geese, not ducks? so cool! ( ;

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