Thursday, October 18, 2018

Teweikan

A reminder to members of City Daily Photo that the theme day for November is Friend.

I start today with three versions of the same shot, first the normal take, and two edits to enhance the colours of this pair of topiaries.


Collective Work/ Teweikan is a topiary inspired by a First Nations word for the drum, a central part of many indigenous cultures in North America. The imagery on the drum includes the eagle and the medicine wheel.


Across from the above was this unfinished topiary of a swan. This was here last year as well, and while there was no one doing so during my visit, I remember a couple of visits from last year where this was the site of one of the groundskeepers using this topiary to explain the process of creating a topiary. Hence the unfinished status of it. I enhanced the colours for a second take on this photo.


The next topiary on the trail was one that was here last year. On The Trail Of The Algonquin People, designed by Anishinabe artist Dean Ottawa, depicts a family working together to build a birchbark canoe.


I wanted different settings of the same two shots, including black and white in one case, choosing two different vantage points.

27 comments:

  1. Your topiary shots are so interesting! Not something I see very often.

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  2. Reminds me of how I was always messing with my canoe.

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  3. ...they sure do things on a large scale!

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  4. More great topiaries. Thanks for the remind on the city daily photo theme. It would be nice to see lots of participaton.

    Janis
    GDP

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  5. The different effects really change the look. So interesting!

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  6. @Linda: thanks!

    @Revrunner: it requires upkeep!

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Jan: I think so too.

    @Tom: very large scale.

    @Janis: I've got some of my shots already set, and others yet to be added.

    @Marie: they do!

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  7. These are so wonderful. I am enjoying them, every one. I wondered how they are created.

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  8. Fabulous they are William.. good idea to leave one as a demonstration of the creating of the toparies ✨

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  9. The people behind all these beautiful topiaries deserve the credit. They did a great job.

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  10. The last ones with the aboriginals and canoe is very life like . Colorful.

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  11. I'm with Nancy Chan, really a great job !

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  12. @DJan: it's quite something, seeing that frame. I've watched a demonstration before. The plants are inserted into the soil, one by one.

    @Grace: it is a good idea.

    @Nancy: they did indeed.

    @Red: it certainly is.

    @Karl: very much so.

    @Lady Fi: that they are.

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  13. Love the First Nation topiaries ~ beautiful ~ neat photos editing too.

    Happy Day to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  14. Again very beautiful sculptures !!

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  15. I enjoyed seeing your photo editing, such wonderful results.

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  16. I like the variations in colours.

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  17. @Carol: thanks!

    @Gattina: that they are.

    @RedPat: wonder indeed.

    @Bill: thank you!

    @Marleen: so do I.

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  18. Such great works of art!
    (In addition to experimenting with color enhancements have you tried working with lighting and exposure levels? You can do a lot there. I often lighten mine and then juice up the contrast. It helps a lot where I haven't had the best lighting conditions.)

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  19. The different effects can change the look.
    But I have enjoyed seeing all your work here William.

    Also, I do agree with Nancy (above) when she said "The people behind all these beautiful topiaries deserve credit. They did a great job."

    All the best Jan

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  20. always a fan of any sort of kayak or canoe. boat. ( ;

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  21. These are stunning! I like the way you're playing with the colour.

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