Saturday, March 23, 2019

Fighters

Models of air fields and shops can be seen here and there at the museum, such as this one.


Here is another view of what we left off with yesterday.


This is the Sopwith 7F.1 Snipe, the last British fighter to enter service during the Great War.


A bust of William Barker, a Canadian pilot and ace of that war, is positioned close by.


A display case nearby shows in detail with a demonstration how pilots could fire machine guns through their propellers in combat without damaging their own aircraft. It required creative engineering, but pressing the button and getting the propeller going on this display shows it in action.


And here's another of those models.


The Bristol F2B Fighter was a mainstay for allied air forces during the war. This particular one is one of only three in the world that is still airworthy. We'll pick up with it tomorrow.

36 comments:

  1. Wonderful old planes here and last post William. It sounds weird I know but somehow I don't think I'd be as nervous in one of these as I am in a modern big passenger plane higher up 😀

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  2. Interesting to see all these old planes. It must have taken a lot of time and effort to build the models.

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  3. Models are often useful in seeing how things work.

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  4. Such amazing informations you give us! Thank you!

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  5. ...times sure have changed.

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  6. Creative the people were. I wonder why this is all gone now (seemingly).

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  7. so cool. i love design. way fun. ( ;

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  8. Hello, what a cool museum! Happy weekend!

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  9. @Grace: thank you.

    @Nancy: it would.

    @Joan: true.

    @Jim: I thought so.

    @Ella: you're welcome.

    @Tom: they have.

    @Iris: innovations don't always hold to one older idea.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Beth: thanks!

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  10. It is interesting to speculate how they had to figure out how to shoot without taking their own propeller down. Thanks! :-)

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  11. This museums well worth a visit!

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  12. Such brave young men. Flying around in little more than a motorized tin can.

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  13. Intriguing models and airplanes ~ fascinating history of your country ^_^

    Happy Moments to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  14. Without bombers you'd wonder why these planes were valuable.

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  15. Your giving us a great tour again, William.

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  16. I bet the kids love pressing that button and seeing that propellor start.

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  17. The old planes seem so flimsy, as if just one breath of wind would blow them away.

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  18. Forgot to say love your header photo and I want to fly one of these planes.

    cheers, parsnip

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  19. Open cockpit, wind in your face, enemy on your tail. What a rush! Sheesh!

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  20. @Eileen: it is quite a place to visit.

    @DJan: the demonstration feature really shows well how it works.

    @RedPat: yes, it's quite a museum. I'm thinking of visiting the Science And Tech Museum in the coming days. I've never visited there.

    @Marie: they were doing things in those planes that should have been impossible.

    @Carol: not just my country, but those beyond. I thoroughly enjoyed my visit.

    @Red: bombers have had their own part in aerial combat, just as fighters do.

    @Jan: I'm enjoying showing it.

    @Sharon: they would.

    @Shammickite: and yet they seem to have handled well.

    @Cloudia: it's quite an impressive airplane.

    @Parsnip: I doubt they'd let me in the Bristol. :)

    @Revrunner: a rush indeed!

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  21. There is lots to see in this museum. Very nice photos, William.

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  22. Those old planes just look magnificent.

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  23. I cannot imagine flying in one of those old planes.

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  24. Very interesting to see those old airplanes!

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  25. There are a lot of historic planes there. Very interesting!

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  26. So much to see and to learn...

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  27. Interesting to see all the old planes.

    All the best Jan

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  28. There really is a lot of history to learn here.

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  29. I love how the nose of that one plane is so bright and colorful! No missing it!

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  30. Have you ever seen an old aerodrome? They are very cool, I think there are 2 here (Alberta) but I have only seen 1 of them. Google the Vulcan Aerodrome if interested.

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  31. I'd love to fly in such an aeroplane.

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