Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Iconic Planes

Seen in yesterday's post as well, this is the Westland Lysander III. Introduced into the Royal Air Force in 1938, the plane proved to be too slow for the Messerschmitt 109, but ended up seeing a variety of uses through the war in Allied air, particularly in terms of reconnaissance and insertion and extraction of agents in occupied Europe. The Royal Canadian Air Force made use of these as training craft. This one was restored by RCAF personnel as a centennial project and presented to the museum in 1968. The bicycle beside it is a folding type used by paratroopers.


The Lancaster dominates this section, and this one, a Canadian version of the dependable bomber, is best seen from multiple angles. Here we have the rear gun turret. 


Another gun turret stands nearby on its own. The Glenn L. Martin Company made them for the B-26 Marauder bomber, but they often turned up in Lancasters.


This is described in the panels as an anachronism of the war. The Fairey Swordfish was a biplane probably more suited to the First World War, yet served throughout the Second World War with specialties including torpedo bombing and anti-submarine warfare. As slow as this plane could be, the Swordfish had the particular distinction of having had sunk more enemy ships than any other Allied aircraft, including taking part in the sinking of the Bismarck. The RCAF made use of these planes too.

32 comments:

  1. Crazy how such beauties can do so much harm.

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  2. Here we don't really hear about the Canadian contribution to the war effort. It is all about Australian and US forces.

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  3. Aircrafts are one of my passions...

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  4. I love flying .. I love aircrafts ..

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  5. Glad that these planes are preserved for exhibits only.

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  6. Today's assortment of planes is so beautiful, but they honestly don't look like they should be able to fly!

    Janis
    GDP

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  7. ...the Lancaster has a interesting nose!

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  8. I really like the first photo. The plane was restored well.

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  9. I'm glad you are including some of the history of these planes. I am enjoying learning so much.

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  10. @Iris: I had that thought about the Lancaster- it's such a beautiful plane, but also one that is capable of inflicting great destruction.

    @Joan: here we do tell of what Canadians were up to.

    @Italiafinlandia: you'd enjoy this museum.

    @Ella: I do as well.

    @Nancy: they're good exhibits.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Janis: some might still be airworthy, but others are what they call static exhibits. As a general rule, you'd have to move quite a number of artifacts to get an airworthy plane out to the runways outside.

    @Tom: the Lancaster is quite a beauty.

    @Anvilcloud: a Lysander is quite a plane.

    @DJan: thank you!

    @Bill: thanks!

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  11. Swordfish...strange name for a plane, and a bit of a strange plane at that!

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  12. So much care has gone into these planes!

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  13. Wonderful iconic airplane displays ~

    Happy Moments to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  14. the military had new schemes everyday to win the war. So many of the developments from the war were used to design civilian projects.

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  15. It's wonderful to see all these planes have been restored and preserved for us to see. Wonderful documentation!

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  16. I've seen photos of the Westland Lysander before. Those circles always make me think there is target painted on the plane which doesn't sound like a very good idea.

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  17. @Barbara: yes, quite an oddity.

    @RedPat: these are definitely well cared for.

    @Carol: thank you.

    @Red: that's true.

    @Betty: thanks!

    @Sharon: it was quite a plane.

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  18. The Lancaster is unfortunately well known overhere. During the Second World War several of them crashed in Friesland, because they were hit by the Germans.

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  19. My father in law flew a Lancaster during the war.. not much protection there. He was one of the lucky ones to survive ✨

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  20. A great exhibit. The old planes are fascinating.

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  21. A gun turret...

    It is sobering to think that was designed and built for the sole purpose of shooting another person,

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  22. my Dad was in the Army and did work on plane .. i think that is why i enjoy all planes ... they are just so awesome!!! what history. such stories they would or could probably tell. ( ;

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  23. The rear gunners were very brave men, such an exposed small space and up in the air too:)

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  24. A wonderful exhibit, William. Your photos show it well.

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  25. @Jan: bomber crews ran a lot of risks throughout that war, on both sides.

    @Grace: he would have had to be.

    @Marie: that they are.

    @Sandi: and yet it had to be done.

    @Karl: I certainly think so.

    @Beth: there are a lot of stories here.

    @Rosie: that is true.

    @Bill: thank you!

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  26. This has been a great series, super photos!

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  27. Those gunners featured prominently in movies I've seen of WWII.

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  28. I thought I'd been here, but perhaps not!

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  29. It's good that these planes are preserved …

    All the best Jan

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