Sunday, March 24, 2019

Survivors

Here we have some additional views of that exquisite Bristol fighter.


Nearby are extensive displays about Wallace Turnbull, a Canadian engineer whose innovations included his take on a variable-pitch propeller that revolutionized the industry.


This is one of the models in a display case. You can see it in the photo that follows.


The Bristol has a neighbour. The Junkers J.I was the first all metal plane to go into production. This is the only surviving one of its kind in the world. It was presented to Canada as a war trophy in 1919, exhibited that year at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto, and has spent time in various spots around the country before being transferred to the museum's collection in 1969.

31 comments:

  1. It is amazing what people created and still do.

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  2. Imagine that those pilots flew with these aircrafts. They must have been daredevils.

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  3. ...wonderful pieces of history!

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  4. Gosh we've come a long way since then William and these little beauties started it all ✨

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  5. Amazing what was accomplished with those small planes ~

    Happy Moments to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  6. Amazing history here. I've always been fascinated by all kinds of aircraft. Have a wonderful week.

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  7. I can not imagine flying on those airplanes

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  8. finalement ces avions tombaient moins souvent que ceux de maintenant

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  9. I like how they had exhausts from each piston and no mufflers.

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  10. way cool. love the plane ... neat design. ( ;

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  11. The last Junkers in the world. What a treat to see it.

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  12. Very exceptional plane. I like them. Boeing being born out this way we have some fantastic aviation museums out here I should go there
    MB

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  13. William I am sure you would appreciate a visit to some of the air museums over in this country like the shuttleworth collection https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shuttleworth_Collection

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  14. Amazing airplanes! Thank you for sharing them with me. :-)

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  15. Sehr interessant die Flugzeuge im Museum.

    Noke

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  16. Great shots of these grand old planes. I love these exhibits. We have one about half an hour away and always take our visitors. Thanks for sharing them William.

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  17. @Italiafinlandia: I agree.

    @Iris: definitely.

    @Marianne: they would have been.

    @Tom: that they are.

    @Grace: a long way indeed.

    @Carol: that's true.

    @Betty: thank you.

    @Catarina: it was learning fast by trial and error in those early planes.

    @Bergson: merci.

    @Red: so do I.

    @Beth: thanks.

    @Ella: indeed.

    @Sharon: it is!

    @MB: you should.

    @Bill: I would enjoy that.

    @Marie: it is.

    @DJan: you're welcome.

    @Noke: thank you.

    @Denise: you're welcome.

    @Francisco: thanks!

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  18. Beautiful planes with lots of history and stories.

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  19. They'd give me the willies to be up in them!

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  20. This is such a great museum!

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  21. Such amazing history here, a fantastic museum.

    All the best Jan

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  22. I like that plane in the first three photos.

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  23. I always enjoy visiting museums like this, filled with history. The early airplanes were aerodynamic miracles!

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  24. Some of those old planes were real works of art.

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  25. Interesting exhibits. I only get to see these war planes in war movies.

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  26. Those really are quite large! It makes you think how exposed pilots were during the war.

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