Wednesday, March 20, 2019

In Flight

The historical panels at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum examine the aviation engineers and innovators who, in the final years of the 19th century and the first of the 20th century were looking for ways to take to the air. They came from places around the world, racing to solve the problems.


It was the Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, who made the breakthrough at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in December 1903.


A model of their Flyer I is in the display case nearby.


With the idea of heavier than air flight taking off, it sparked an industry around the world.


The museum's collection is laid out thematically and chronologically, with wide paths winding around each portion where planes are grouped together. Early planes are here near where we started, including this one. French engineers Louis Bleriot and Raymond Saulnier designed the Bleriot XI in 1908. This model dates to 1911. 

33 comments:

  1. I remember my brothers used to make little bulsawood planes like the model there.

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  2. Adventurous constructions - I´d never be that brave (lucky they were).

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  3. I would never have taken a flight with such an engine ! Even had bad experiences with a plane in 64 !

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  4. I can also build airplanes ... from paper! :))
    This museum is very interesting and worth a visit!

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  5. As gloriosas máquinas voadoras, aproveito para desejar a continuação de uma boa semana.

    Andarilhar
    Dedais de Francisco e Idalisa
    O prazer dos livros

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  6. ...a brave bunch of people!

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  7. Thanks to all these brave people! I would love to visit and enjoy the exhibits.

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  8. Isn't it amazing we can fly??

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  9. those men are too cool, love the mustaches ... way awesome, such character! ( ;

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  10. It's amazing to think it was only 1903 when flight began, and now look where we are: flying anywhere in the world, mostly safely. :-)

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  11. I just realized our national Dutch airline KLM celebrated its 100th anniversary last week. :-)

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  12. I love flight...but imagine all the crashes that had to occur before the right combination was achieved. Do you think paper airplanes were invented before or after men were flying in these (more or less) real planes?

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  13. They were very low tech but it was the start of something big.

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  14. @Joan: that's a habit I never had.

    @Iris: it's astounding that these early planes flew. But it was a lot of trial and error.

    @Italiafinlandia: I thoroughly enjoyed my visit.

    @Gattina: I've never had problems flying.

    @Ella: it's been awhile since I made a paper airplane!

    @Francisco: thank you!

    @Tom: definitely!

    @Nancy: it is quite a museum.

    @Sandi: it is.

    @Marie: there is a lot.

    @Beth: indeed.

    @Anvilcloud: I agree.

    @DJan: mostly safely indeed.

    @Jan: quite an anniversary.

    @Barbara: I wondered that!

    @Red: it was indeed.

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  15. Those old flying machines are something to see!

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  16. Hello, it is an interesting exhibit to see. Thanks for sharing. Enjoy your day!

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  17. Great exhibition. These old airplanes are so fascinating!

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  18. Wonderful flight exhibit ~ thanks!

    Happy Moments to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  19. Speaking of the Wright Brothers . . . :-)

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  20. Seeing these aircraft reminded me of visiting the Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.

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  21. There wasn't much structure to those first planes!

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  22. It's interesting seeing aviation in its early stages. I was aways fancinated by airplanes when I was young, loved to watch them land and takeoff.

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  23. @Sharon: they are!

    @Eileen: you're welcome.

    @Tamago: I agree.

    @Carol: a pleasure to show it.

    @Revrunner: yes, you mentioned them the other day!

    @Beatrice: I'd love to visit that one.

    @RedPat: different materials than we'd see now. Bamboo and silk in some cases.

    @Bill: I think many kids grew up fascinated by planes.

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  24. This reminds me of the Smithsonian air and space museum.

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  25. We saw a model of the Wright Flyer at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum. It was astonishingly fragile looking.

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  26. Aviation is one place where it pays to keep your nose in the air.

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  27. The Aviation Museum is a fund of information William, we have a couple here that I keep meaning to visit.. you might just have spurred me on to do so 😊

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  28. Such an interesting exhibition.

    All the best Jan

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