Thursday, March 28, 2019

Spitfire And Lancaster

The Spitfire caught the imagination of the public throughout World War Two. Along with the Hurricane, this fighter was a mainstay of the Battle of Britain and a common sight among Allied air assets from multiple countries, including Canada. This particular one saw service with RCAF squadrons during the war.


Here we have a proper view of the plane I've been showing you bits and pieces of for the last few posts. The Lancaster is described as the backbone of Bomber Command. Canadian factories were among those who built the Lancaster Mk. X for Allied air forces, and Lancasters were part of the RCAF throughout the war and afterwards. If I had to pick a single favourite plane in the collection here, it would be this one.


A model of the Lancaster is down at the edge of the path.


From the painted additions indicating bombing runs, this one saw its share of action.


I leave off with this shot from beneath the Lancaster. We move into some civilian aircraft tomorrow.

32 comments:

  1. The planes are well preserved. Happy day!

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  2. Interesting post. The final shot is quite dramatic!

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  3. I do believe I stood under a Lancaster in the Aviation museum in Perth 2006. A huge thing it was. Impressive.

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  4. Now those are two names I am familiar with though I could not tell one from the other.

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  5. spitfire, I like that name. And, I'm with Jan K. Afanja. Like the perspective on the last shot.


    Janis
    GDP

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  6. Wonderful shots of the airplanes and museum. Happy Thursday, enjoy your day and weekend ahead.

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  7. ...two important workhorses of the war effort.

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  8. @Nancy: that they are.

    @Linda: I certainly thought so. The business side of a Lancaster makes for an interesting shot.

    @Iris: they are a huge plane. Not as much as say a contemporary passenger jet, but for its time, big.

    @Italiafinlandia: quite so.

    @Joan: I've long been familiar with both.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Jan: so do I.

    @Janis: it's good.

    @Eileen: thank you.

    @Tom: very much so.

    @Anvilcloud: literally!

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  9. Amazing aircraft. I am learning a great deal through your posts. :-)

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  10. Amazing how aircraft have changed. We have a military base close by and I watch the fighter jets take off all of the time. Matter of fact the runway is just behind Walmart!

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  11. Love these old planes. We have a Spitfire in our local Museum as its designer Reginald Mitchell came from round here:)

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  12. Lindo de ver esses modelos de aeronaves e ver a sua evolução
    Beijinhos

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  13. It seems to be the only one that I think of when I think of the WWII planes.

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  14. I'm still waiting for my favorite...the Harvards? Are there any Harvards?

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  15. @DJan: thank you!

    @Janey: planes do change!

    @Rosie: the Spitfire was an exceptional plane.

    @Gracita: thank you.

    @RedPat: Spitfires have that effect.

    @Red: there is a Harvard in here- I'm not sure if I photographed it, as I haven't prepped the post with that area as of yet.

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  16. So interesting to see these planes here a d last few posts. They are quite rightly so beautifully looked after. In memory of a dreadful war and the brave men who flew them ✨

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  17. So, there is another airplane with a target painted on it.

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  18. Great. Love to see old planes. Sharing with you this video. I hope you like it (Lancaster Spitfire Gilze Rijen Airshow): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9rxBjn84RA

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  19. William your a man after my own heart liking the Lancaster. We had the Battle of britain flight one fly over our village years ago. It came over at Tree top hight and made the hair on the back of my neck stand on end. It was the most awe inspireing sound I ever heard after a spitfire. The Flying Fort I saw many yers pevious was not a patch on it

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  20. wonder what those medals (yellow on front of the plane) are 4? is that 83 of them? i kind of went cross eyed trying to count them? i think i am right?? lol. so tiny on the screen? ( :

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  21. @Grace: the museum takes good care of them.

    @Sharon: and yet hard to hit.

    @Aritha: thank you, I'll check it out!

    @Bill: their sound is a splendid one.

    @Beth: they're bombs, painted on. They denote bombing missions.

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  22. The last photo is quite impressive.

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  23. Thanks for the look at the Spitfire!

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  24. It's interesting to see how large these are with the people standing beneath!

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  25. Wonderful planes.
    Love your last photograph here.

    All the best Jan

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