Tuesday, November 26, 2019

The Final Push To Victory

As the war drove towards its end, Canadian troops would take part in the Rhineland campaign.


This pistol, from that campaign, is one of my favourite artifacts of the Museum. The explanatory panel gives the reason why.


In the Pacific Theatre, Canadians played other roles.


Hiroshima and Nagasaki would bring an end to the war. Among the items here is a tile from a temple in Hiroshima, which was exposed to the radiation of the atomic blast.


For many Canadians, the war in Europe ended with the liberation of the Netherlands. A fountain pen was used during the surrender signing, and it now resides here.


Canada had provided a place of refuge for the Crown Princess of the Netherlands, and the liberation of the country by Canadian troops established a deep and lasting friendship between two countries, one of the positive outcomes of war.

27 comments:

  1. Oh? We had but WWII at school in history (it felt that way), but the Netherlands weren´t even mentioned (or I was sick that day! Joke.).
    I really wonder why we had to remember exact dates non-stop but never got drawn the whole picture.
    Thank you for making up for that.

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  2. I was 3 years old when the Americans occupied the city and I remember the crashing of the street when the tanks rolled over the street and left huge holes !

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  3. Make babies not war!😅
    peace ✌

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  4. I keep thinking war will become obsolete...
    Janis GDP

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  5. i guess there are fewer folks who want handshakes ...they just want the perfect selfie now, i would guess? ( :

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  6. ...the friendship between Canada and the Netherlands is wonderful.

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  7. Next year in May we hope to be able to once again receive the last Canadians who helped to liberate our province in Friesland to attend the commemoration of the dead and the liberation festivities.

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  8. There is a special bond between Canada and the Netherlands!

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  9. I didn't know about the Netherlands connection with Canada. I have learned a great deal in these posts. Thank you.

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  10. Finally over! This has been a good series, William.

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  11. Many Dutch people live here . They comment about the Canadian effort to free Holland. The Dutch were suffering very much at the end of the war.

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  12. Okay...I love that story on the pistol.

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  13. A victorious day indeed William, this has been a super informative series, merci beaucoup ✨

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  14. @Iris: you're welcome.

    @Italiafinlandia: indeed.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Gattina: old streets weren't built for tanks, after all.

    @Ella: if only.

    @Janis: I doubt it.

    @Beth: perhaps.

    @Tom: it is!

    @Jan: I imagine it might be the last time.

    @Marie: that there is.

    @Anvilcloud: it is!

    @DJan: you're welcome.

    @RedPat: more to come.

    @Red: they were indeed.

    @Sharon: I do as well.

    @Grace: thank you!

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  15. Victory is sweet and lovely documented exhibit of it ~ ^_^

    Happy Day to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  16. Three cheers for Pvt. Kaye. Hip, hip, hooray.Hip, hip, hooray.Hip, hip, hooray.

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  17. Interesting---it all is. The pistol looks like the one my husband's older brother brought home from the Pacific in 1945
    MB

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  18. Such an interesting post! I hope Private Kaye lived a good long life.

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  19. Love Canada, love the Netherlands. So, of course I love this post, William.

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  20. We went through the war museum in Korea last year. A beautiful structure house some sad displays ☹️

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  21. Private Kaye was a brave man:)

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  22. Interesting to read the pistol story … thank you.

    All the best Jan

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