Monday, April 26, 2021

Religious Works

 Today we start moving into world art with the collection at the National Gallery. We begin with religious art, which was the predominant theme in art centuries ago. This is one such example. Triptych of the Virgin and Child is by Jacopo di Cione., and dates back to circa 1370- 80.

A couple of views of the same space- one with a gallery visitor and one without.


This is The Virgin and Child With Saints, by Benozzo Gozzolo, circa 1476-77.


Tommaso del Mazza is the artist behind this work, Saints Peter, John the Baptist, and Bartholomew, done circa 1385-90.


For today we finish with these candlesticks, credited to Master I.C.. Pair of Candlesticks dates to circa 1575-1600.

 

31 comments:

  1. They may have been great artists but they had obviously never looked closely at babies.

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  2. Interesting religious art. The candlesticks are well preserved.

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  3. Of course there was only religious art ! The church was the only one which had enough money to pay for cathedrals and artwork instead of feeding the people !

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  4. Love especially the candlesticks. "Sadly" all wooden floors here so no fire..

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  5. Hello,

    Beautiful art display! Take care, enjoy your day! Have a great new week!

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  6. Interesting, but not really my thing.

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  7. It is amazing how much time, money and energy has been invested in invisible others.

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  8. ...iot has always been an important subject for art.

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  9. Religion has been an opportunity for art through the centuries...

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  10. @John: I wonder based on some paintings if the artists spent any time in the company of babies.

    @Nancy: that they are.

    @Gattina: religion was the biggest subject.

    @Iris: as art goes, candlesticks are unusual.

    @orvokki: I think so.

    @Eileen: thank you.

    @Jan: I suppose I relate more to the artistic than the religious.

    @David: a lot.

    @Tom: indeed.

    @Italiafinlandia: it has.

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  11. How does a treasure such as the triptych survive those centruries?

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  12. Religous art in gold frames feels holy. Good photos

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  13. I remember seeing this part of the museum. I was particularly impressed with the wooden carvings.

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  14. That room looks a lot like the rooms of museums all over Europe.

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  15. Many of these icons are truly worth of being preserved.

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  16. Very European collection. The candlesticks are quite extraordinary to been in such good condition after such lot of year.

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  17. Nice art, very much appreciated even in the twenty-first century.

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  18. Considering the age of the artwork they are in incredible condition. The gallery is doing an excellent job.

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  19. @Marie: with great care.

    @Magiceye: I think so.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @RedPat: I agree.

    @Maywyn: thanks!

    @Red: it is all well looked after.

    @Sharon: it does.

    @Revrunner: indeed.

    @Gemel: they were well taken care of over the centuries.

    @Bill: definitely.

    @DJan: quite true.

    @fun60: I agree.

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  20. I've always liked religious art.

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  21. What a grand period! Lovely paintings and candlesticks. So much to appreciate.

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  22. Triptych is my favorite ~ XX

    Living moment to moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  23. I love religious art -- it's beautiful and so well done. Such a different style.

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  24. my religion doesnt show human form., but the art is deep and beautiful too.. ;p

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