Monday, April 12, 2021

Water And Portraits

I left off yesterday with works by Cornelius Krieghoff. Here are two more, both paintings of waterfalls. The Passing Storm, Saint-Ferreol dates to 1854.  The Saint Anne Falls is from 1855.


This is a self portrait by the artist, also dating to 1855.


Here we have Sister Saint-Alphonse, an 1841 portrait by Antoine Plamondon.


Two more portraits, by two different artists. Thomas Chandler Haliburton is a circa 1835 portrait by William Valentine.


Close by is this one by Albert Gallatin Hoit, an American artist who did some work in Canada and had an influence on portraiture in the Maritimes. This is Johanna Robinson Hazen, and dates to 1852.


Two more portraits, by the same artist. Robert Field painted 
these in 1808, and features a married couple. Lady Croke is at top, with Sir Alexander Croke at the bottom of this pair.

30 comments:

  1. Some of the portraits have compelling eyes.

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  2. Nice to see the fashion of the time...

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  3. All very serious, smiling wasn't in fashion for portraits I assume. Fabulous works though.

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  4. Although they are all very well and beautiful painted, I prefer the landscapes above the portraits.

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  5. Hello,
    Wonderful collection of portraits. Take care, have a happy day!

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  6. @Linda: they do.

    @Italiafinlandia: it is.

    @Gemel: quite true.

    @Jan: I do too.

    @Eileen: thanks!

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  7. Canada's art history is rich, varied and meritorious.

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  8. Who would have thought back then that someday someone would take an instant picture of the portrait for which they painstakingly sat?

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  9. ...water was an important part of the settlement of the New World.

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  10. I find self portraits fascinating.

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  11. Again the portraits are magnificent and so are the waterfall paintings.

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  12. The portraits are wonderful!

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  13. I like Kreighoff's work that he did in western Canada.

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  14. Great portraits.
    I see tulip season has arrived, they are such beautiful flowers!

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  15. That's a great group of portraits.

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  16. Interesting looking portraits, I like them.

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  17. I do like portraits. I always wonder what the subjects were like as people.

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  18. Interesting portraits. So dour looking. What would happen if someone smiled. Oh yeah the bad teeth---LOL
    MB

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  19. Interesting portraits. I like the nun especially.

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  20. It feels one with all to think about all of the caring and labor that has gone before, William

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  21. All nice to see but I especially like the nun portrait.

    All the best Jan

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  22. @David: quite so.

    @Anvilcloud: things change!

    @Tom: that's true.

    @Marie: as do I.

    @Magiceye: I agree.

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  23. @RedPat: they are.

    @Red: I do as well.

    @Sami: no, not quite yet. The header is from last year.

    @Sharon: I certainly think so.

    @Nancy: definitely!

    @Revrunner: indeed.

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  24. @Bill: so do I.

    @Jeanie: a good way of thinking of it.

    @MB: that would certainly be the case.

    @DJan: it's a good portrait.

    @Cloudia: it does.

    @Jan: thank you!

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  25. I would prefer Sir Alexander sans wig.

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  26. Wonderful portraits here and last post William. I really love the ceiling in the Rideau Chapel a few posts back, so beautiful, I enjoyed the link to the music also ✨

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  27. Very classic portraits ~ great photo display ~ Happy Week to you ~ Xo

    Living moment by moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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