Sunday, February 21, 2016

Applying Flame To The Ice

I came into Confederation Park, where a videographer was set up beside the ice sculpture marking the centennial of the National Research Council. A man was setting up behind one of the two side sculptures with the dates. He lit up what looked rather like a welding torch, which was linked to the device you can see in his hands here. He directed the fire at the back of the sculpture, carefully applying the flame to the surface while the videographer filmed the process. I took several shots. The sculpture was none the worse for wear.

37 comments:

  1. Interesting to see using the fire on the ice sculptures.

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  2. You earned this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzKin-uiBwY

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  3. I had never seen that. Here it is unusual to see a sculture of ice.

    Tomás.

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  4. Very special to treat the ice with fire.

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  5. Good heavens! Was he reshaping the sculpture using flame rather than the convectional method of ice carving I wonder William?

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  6. I think it is what makes the sculptures clear. 'Bout to watch Coludia's video myself!

    Janis
    GDP

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  7. @Orvokki: it is!

    @Cloudia: I will have to check that out when I get to a desktop.

    @Tomas: it has been common here from the beginning of the festival.

    @Gunn: it takes great care.

    @Marianne: yes it is.

    @Grace: fire brings out unusual textures in ice, so carvers use it.

    @Janis: not really, the ice comes clear when they start.

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  8. Amazing..I'd never of thought it, I would have assumed the whole thing would have ended up as a puddle..

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  9. Do you think this is what inspired Robert Frost?

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  10. You'd really have to know what you're doing and have a steady hand for that process!

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  11. Fire AND ice, how dramatic! I'm glad the world didn't end.

    I (the desert dweller) have never heard of such a thing. So interesting.

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  12. Some very interesting shots!

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  13. There has to be a good reason for this. I would think he's melting the surface to keep it smooth and it may be that this slows down melting with a smooth surface. Did you ask him," What the hell are you doing?"

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  14. I guess that's what makes all smooth and shiny.
    MB

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  15. @Geoff: with great care, it doesn't!

    @Sharon: I wonder what he'd have thought of the art.

    @Lowell: a very steady hand!

    @Dina: it is a curious mix.

    @VP: thank you!

    @Red: I should have asked!

    @Marleen: I think so.

    @Norma: I've watched them do this in the past, but at more of a distance. It's used sparingly.

    @MB: it certainly helps things along. I imagine this was a demonstration sort of thing for the benefit of the videographer.

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  16. Fascinating to see the fire on the ice!

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  17. It must be to clean the surface off of any shards!

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  18. Interesting. Must be to smooth things out.

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  19. I never seen fire used on ice. Looks like a very interesting process.

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  20. Reducing times to sculpt. Market economy. :|

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  21. @EG: it is!

    @RedPat: I do wonder!

    @Eve: that's possible.

    @Bill: it was interesting to watch.

    @MDP: that's one way to see it!

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  22. These are wonderful photos showing an unusual technique.

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  23. Great pictures! Fire on ice is such a beautiful sight!

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  24. Fire and ice, what a strange and fascinating combination.

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  25. Fire and ice. Kind of sounds like a rock group. :-)

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  26. @Kate: thanks!

    @Tamago: I was pleased by how well the flame showed up.

    @Jan: they seem to mix well.

    @Revrunner: there are a couple of DC Comics characters by that name.

    @Mari: I think so!

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  27. that's awesome!! ( ;
    hope your weekend is going well!!

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  28. Fire and ice? Not something I'd expect!

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  29. Is the torch used to melt the ice so it will seal better? Interesting to see these works of art.

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  30. This is simply fascinating. I'd love to watch!

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  31. Does that make it translucent?

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  32. @Beth: thanks!

    @Kay: an odd mix.

    @Pamela: I do think this was meant as a demonstration for posterity.

    @Ciel: it was fun to watch.

    @Linda: the ice comes translucent when they start setting up. Outdoor sculptures like this lose some of that as time goes on- exposure to sunlight does that, but Winterlude officials do keep these ones wrapped up if there's a mild spell with what looks like an insulating blanket.

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