Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Carving Shapes Out Of The Snow

Most of the snow sculptures at Lansdowne Park were completed when I stopped by to take photographs, but one was being worked on by this fellow, using a chainsaw. I thought it was an interesting idea to photograph some of the process.


I'll show you the finished sculpture in tomorrow's post. Here are two of the other sculptures.

37 comments:

  1. Wood sculptors sometimes let the patterns of the wood guide the sculpture. Snow and ice seem like such a blank slate. It's wonderful to see what the sculptors make of it.

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  2. The last sculpture is fine.

    Tomás.

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  3. Erstaunlich was aus Schnee und Eis entstehen kann.

    Gruß
    Noke

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  4. It must be very cold to keep them "alive".

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  5. @Kay: that makes sense to me.

    @Tomas: the abominabl snowman does look whimsical.

    @Noke: thank you!

    @Bill: a lot of different methods go into it.

    @Marianne: snow sculptures seem more durable. As long as the temps stay around freezing and there's no rain.

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  6. Wonderful to see the process come alive.

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  7. Love the process; love the sense of humor.

    Janis
    GDP

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  8. How interesting to see a work in progress William, looking forward to seeing the results tomorrow!

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  9. Very interesting. I'm wondering where and how they get those big blocks of ice/snow...

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  10. Is that guy bringing up the rear a Yeti?

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  11. He's using all kinds of equipment.

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  12. I guess the guy looks at his block of snow and says I see this in the block and then carves it our.I've seen some where they use color.

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  13. @Bill: it is!

    @Janis: snow sculptures do tend to bring a lot of humour into the equation.

    @Grace: when you see it, you'll like it!

    @Tanya: it was.

    @Tex: that it is.

    @Lowell: I think the snow's fabricated- I know the ice is. These big blocks are brought in crates.

    @Norma: it is, yes!

    @Sharon: saws, chainsaws, what looks like a wrench or a crowbar to knock out a section. They use finer instruments as they go along.

    @Red: I think that's right. Tomorrow you'll see some of these lit up.

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  14. Wonderful to see this man doing his job.
    I wonder how the snow is pressed together before the carvers start working with it ...

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  15. Thanks for the tutorial! Now all I need is snow and ice!

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  16. That's amazing wonderful work and photos of it all ! Thanks for sharing , It is pouring rain here today and windy . Have a good day !

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  17. Great idea, I really enjoyed these photos of the process. Thank you :)

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  18. @Jan: I think it's part of the fabrication process that keeps it all together until it's ready for the carvers.

    @Cloudia: you're welcome! Plenty of snow here.

    @Halcyon: they're very talented.

    @Country Gal: we're getting it all as snow.

    @Denise: you're welcome.

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  19. Interesting, but nothing like the wonderful ice sculptures!

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  20. I do wonder where all the compression of the snow takes place.

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  21. Incoyable. It almost looks like expanded polystyrene!

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  22. A fun way to experience the cold!!!

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  23. I like that! It's not something you see very often.

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  24. @Orvokki: it is.

    @VP: I'm not done with the ice sculptures, fortunately.

    @RedPat: I wonder too!

    @Ciel: I can see that.

    @Chieftess: it is, yes.

    @Marleen: only in winter!

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  25. You would NEVER want to put a chainsaw in my hands. NEVER! :-)

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  26. Fascinating stuff William, I still can't get my head around how attacking a block of ice with a chainsaw produces such wonderful delicate sculptures..

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  27. Unbelievable...and with a chain saw, no less!

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  28. i would have never guessed that would be the end result. i was curious about the building behind there, is that one you have shared before? those toppers are too cool. neat-O!! ( :

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  29. They use tools for all sorts of things. I'm mundane. Just the shrubs.

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  30. @Revrunner: I can't be trusted either!

    @Geoff: it takes great care at times!

    @Linda: indeed!

    @Beth: yes, that's the Aberdeen Pavilion- I'll make a note of it in tomorrow's post just for others who might have been wondering.

    @Mari: this takes a lot of practice!

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  31. He certainly seems to know what he's doing! I would never have guessed anyone would use a chainsaw to create something so beautiful.

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