Sunday, November 27, 2016

Cold War And Peacekeeping

After leaving the Second World War behind, the War Museum moves into the Cold War to present day area, examining the Cold War, peacekeeping, and the Korean War along the way. There are a series of paintings here by the Canadian war artist Ted Zuber, depicting the Korean conflict. Here are three of them.


This area features equipment from both NATO and Warsaw Pact countries throughout, and peacekeeping gear and art as well.


Emerging from the main exhibit area takes us down to Regeneration Hall, the portion of the museum beneath the large protuding spike you can see from the outside. The Vimy Ridge Memorial sculptures used by Walter Allward during his time designing the memorial are placed down below, and the window from this angle provides a direct view towards Parliament Hill. Check out this video I took for the sound of the recorded wind you hear in this space. 

26 comments:

  1. Thank you for the interesting tour of the war museum. Great paintings!

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  2. It must be cold to hear the noise of the wind in that place. (Just kidding).

    Tomás.

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  3. You have a really great reportages.
    I like these photos.

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  4. Good link William, interesting to see what goes on down there in Regeneration Hall! For war buffs the Museum is a must see!

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  5. Uma excelente reportagem com fotos muito bem clicadas
    Um ótimo domingo
    Abraços

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  6. Cold war history. Very timely post given the death of Fidel Castro.

    Janis
    GDP

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  7. I was a bit too young to be drafted in WWII, and that was still the case for the Korean War. But, I remember what a terrible war that was. My wife's uncle was came home intact but severely damaged from his experiences as a medic in Korea. I enlisted in the Navy two years after the Korean conflict ended. But the Cold War is still very fresh. Not sure I'd care to see artifacts from that period.

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  8. @Nancy: thanks.

    @Tomas: it is a spooky sound.

    @Orvokki: thank you.

    @Marleen: it is.

    @Grace: true!

    @Gracita: thanks!

    @Janis: which I hadn't known of until a comment yesterday!

    @Linda: quite appropriate.

    @Lowell: in some ways it seems a forgotten war.

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  9. Many times I forget the significance of artists in war. There have been many famous war artists. then there are the photographers?

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  10. This is one great museum and the sound of the wind on your video was very eerie.

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  11. The exhibition sounds amazing especially if you like war history.

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  12. NATO keeps the world on an even keel; or has for decades

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  13. The sound in the video makes thinking about the Cold War and the situation at this moment quite spooky ...

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  14. Peacekeeping is where we belong!

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  15. Yes, peacekeeping is where we belong.

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  16. @Linda: it is quite a museum.

    @Red: there are some of them as well.

    @Sharon: it is.

    @Catalyst: very spooky.

    @Bill: which I do.

    @Cloudia: we'll see what happens now.

    @Jan: yes, indeed.

    @RedPat: we need to get back to more of it.

    @Jennifer: we definitely need to engage in it.

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  17. War Museums are always interesting and they do make us rethink what the H we are doing
    MB

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  18. i often wonder what it would like to see one of those wandering down the road? a tank. kind of weird. creepy too? ( :

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  19. The paintings really depict the miserable conditions for the men fighting in the Korean War.

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  20. The Korean War really tends to get forgotten but it seems the North Koreans aren't ready to let it go these days. That window is really dramatic.

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  21. The North Koreans will never let it go, unfortunately.

    The paintings are thought-provoking.

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