Friday, April 20, 2018

Critters

Several of the horses were out in one enclosure here at the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum during my visit, while a couple of cattle were in another enclosure nearby, the weather being warm enough to let them out for awhile during my visit. This big horse looms before the background of the Horse and Cattle Barn. Horses, various breeds of cattle, and some other animals can be found inside during the winter, and would get some time here or in other pastures in warmer weather, as the dairy herd does.


Here we have another view of the barn. The animals spend colder weather indoors, and the building is equipped to keep temperatures suitable for them through the year, as well as with fans to circulate air throughout. Public paths circle around the edges of the building, while central passageways allow for workers to access the stalls for cleaning and feeding.


This formidable fellow is a Hereford bull named Hercules, born in 2011.


Most of the cattle in here are females. They would be raised for meat on other farms. Here they get names.


This one, for instance, bears the name Everest, and is a Charolais breed.


While this one is an Angus named Lady, caught at two different points in my visit.


It's not all cattle and horses in here though. This pair were busy preening themselves.


This is one of the display panels here in the barn, having a look at the famous horses used by the Mounties during their Musical Ride.

30 comments:

  1. Like to see Herculus. What a large one! When I was a child I lived in a farmer's village. My dad was a teacher there and in front of our house was a meadow with cows: like the black-wite one on your photo. I think they are called Holstein Milk Cows in your language. ( in Dutch: zwartbont). I love them.

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  2. The ol' Hereford bull got my attention. My grandmother had a big ol' Hereford bull on her farm in northern Minnesota. The bull was kept in an enclosed area between the house and the barn. I had to be very careful going to the barn as the bull would put his head down and chase me! It was very scary to a little kid! My uncle just laughed, though, which I thought was wholly inappropriate!

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  3. Oh my, Hercules is really big! I wouldn't dare go too near.

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  4. Thank champion bull has such presence.

    Janis
    GDP

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  5. ...Hercules is 'a lot of bull.'

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  6. You have shared some great photos of your visit. Have a good weekend.

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  7. Hello, great critters. The Hereford Bull is a beast! Happy Friday, enjoy your day and weekend!

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  8. That’s a huge horse. Love the animal photos!

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  9. @Aritha: there are Holsteins, over in the Dairy Barn, which is yet to come.

    @Lowell: I certainly wouldn't want to mess with Hercules!

    @Nancy: that's one big bull.

    @Francisco: indeed!

    @Janis: he's got good credentials.

    @Tom: definitely!

    @Mildred: thanks!

    @Eileen: and quite an impressive beast.

    @Marie: yes, the horses happen to include Clydesdales.

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  10. those animals are well taken care of and look happy. and tall too. ( ;

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  11. I like the looks of that horse! Glad he got outside while the weather wasn't too bad.

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  12. I would be a bad farm girl. I don't think I could part with my animals for meat and I know that's part of the game. I try not to imagine my meat as an animal when I'm eating it! Not always easy but they make it look so un-animal in the store, that helps.

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  13. In the West very few animals are kept indoors. In the old west, thousands of work horses were let loose for the winter. In the spring they were rounded up for farm work. However, this is a research facility so animals are housed to be observed . I do like the large draft horses.

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  14. @Jan: it is!

    @Beth: they are indeed.

    @RedPat: the horses seemed to be enjoying the outdoors.

    @Jeanie: I can understand that!

    @Marleen: a formidable one.

    @Red: here farms are considerably smaller, but it's typical for horses to be able to come and go from interior shelters over the winter.

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  15. Wow! Love all the critters ~ horse photo is my favorite!

    Happy Weekend to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  16. I enjoy seeing the big farm animals, which aren't usually around for city people.
    Love your photo header, lots of tulips. Have a nice weekend William.

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  17. I never tire of the animals...especially the horse!

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  18. I know those animals are well cared for including their normal animal needs and activities

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  19. Hercules, what a great name for that huge bull. Great to see all those animals.

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  20. @Carol: more horses to come before I'm done.

    @Sami: the tulips are yet to come!

    @Norma: these were impressive horses.

    @Cloudia: they certainly seem well looked after. I heard back from the Farm that the larger animals do all get some time outdoors in the winter, and the goats and sheep are raring to get outside too.

    @Bill: it's a splendid name. He looks like a powerful animal.

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  21. Wow Hercules the bull looks huge! Formidable indeed :-)

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  22. Hi William, have just been back to look at missed posts, the Learning Centre is a fascinating area. Oh la! I'm sure the Hereford Bull is not nearly as formidable in nature as in appearance, I hope not anyway ☺

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  23. The black and white cow is a Holstein. She is a dairy cow, not one raised for meat. Holsteins produce huge quanities of milk. Holstein milk is not as high in fat content as the Brown Swiss, the Jersey, or the Guernsey. Just what you wanted to know, right?

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  24. I wonder if that horse is some breed of draught. It looks like the animals have seen enough flash photography that they're reluctant to face a camera.

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  25. Lovely to see the animals, especially Hercules!

    All the best Jan

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