Sunday, April 15, 2018

Kitchen Tools

Picking up where we left off yesterday, the Learning Centre focused on the canning of food goods done at the factory level.


Then I moved over to an area with a kitchen set-up, and various tools set out on counters and a table.


Items laid out in this area included cherry pitters, food mills, knives, apple peelers, bean cutters, jars, cans, pans, mixers, and even a food processor. Some of these items are used for cooking, while others are used for preserving food for future use.

38 comments:

  1. The importance of kitchen tools cannot be over-estimated. We don't need as many these days with it just being the two of us, but we know their significance. I can, I'll have you know, with the right tools, boil eggs. Maybe as many as three at a time! That makes me proud. I can also make toast, but usually burn it. At times I've tried to cook bacon but my friends could not tell the difference between my bacon and shoe leather. We eat out a lot.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Something for everyone down memory lane being nicely showcased. Just now plums and pears are over abundant and are enjoyable and easy to 'stew' if you can't wait till they ripen up.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Finally I am happy that the kitchen tools have improved ! Interesting photos !

    ReplyDelete
  4. A great series of a very interesting exhibit. Thanks for the tour William.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wonderful, I like that old kitchen stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  6. ...how things have changed!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I especially love this post. Reminds me of my grandmother who had every kitchen gadget and was a master at preserving foods.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I was born and raised in the land of food preserving! Still do it!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Many people here still do it, especially in the country.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I hate to waste food, product of my upbringing. Ends of vegetables go into a freezer bag for soup stock.

    ReplyDelete
  11. @Lowell: I would probably burn water.

    @Julia: I can't recall the last time I had pears.

    @Gattina: and yet some of what's here isn't that different today.

    @Denise: you're welcome.

    @Jan: thank you.

    @Tom: they have!

    @Francisco: thanks!

    @Mildred: my mother did some of that.

    @Marie: food preservation does carry on.

    @Marleen: it is the same here.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Great display. Really like this post. Most of this was used when I was brought up on the farm in the 40's and 50's.

    ReplyDelete
  13. This would have interested me. I've watched my grandmother can foods but seeing how a factory does it would be very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Very interesting indeed. I like the kitchen displays and the tools used in the kitchen that believe it or not we still use
    MB

    ReplyDelete
  15. Muito interessante esses utensílios e muito bem fotografado
    Um abraço e um ótimo domingo

    ReplyDelete
  16. @Jackie: my mother was the same.

    @Red: I thought you might relate.

    @Sharon: my mother tended to freeze a lot, but even that required preparation.

    @MB: some of those tools would still get a lot of use in kitchens.

    @Gracita: thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  17. It is good and right that Canada pays attention to such!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I like to see what was used in the past. I like what we use now!

    ReplyDelete
  19. I don't know why, but I find food factories fascinating, especially when you see how things were compared to how they are!

    ReplyDelete
  20. The canning exhibit would be really interesting to see!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Fascinating post of kitchen tools ~ I remember my grandmother saying that phrase 'waste not want not' ~ so true!
    Great photos!

    Namaste,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

    ReplyDelete
  22. @Cloudia: it's well worth paying attention to.

    @Catarina: some things change, some things aren't that different.

    @Jeanie: some of the processing has radically changed.

    @RedPat: I enjoyed visiting in here.

    @Carol: that's a common expression!

    ReplyDelete
  23. I feel like our modern world has lost a lot of these foodie skills. I am mesmerized by the blogs of people who still know how to can and preserve and make everything by hand.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Large production of anything is such an art.

    ReplyDelete
  25. What a fun exhibit! Cherry pitter is something new to me :-)

    ReplyDelete
  26. Interesting, but just think my mother and later with my help always canned at least six hundred quarts of vegetables and fruits, at least a hundred jars or more of jams and jellies and pickles. That doesn't even count the huge crocks of sauerkraut she would put up and all without that fancy equipment.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Some of these photos remind me of my grandmother Dorothy's kitchen. She grew a garden and canned/preserved every bit of it. A lot of work.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Canning is quite a lot of work but worth it in the end. The canner knows what went into the food, which is more than we can say for today's prepared commodities.

    ReplyDelete
  29. This will be one of my favourite place to visit!

    ReplyDelete
  30. A very interesting exhibit, William !

    ReplyDelete
  31. i know that saying ... waste not want not ... oh yeah .. my grandparents said it all the time. ( ;

    ReplyDelete
  32. Making preserves is something I wish I had learned growing up. I know I still could...lol

    ReplyDelete
  33. We actually used to do quite a bit of food preservation. (I am practically an historical artifact myself). We grew a big garden and did 'U-Pick" fruit at orchards. Ate some, canned some, froze some. It was all actually a fun family activity. It's been years and years now though. Thanks for the memories!!

    ReplyDelete
  34. I make stuff for winter too :-)

    ReplyDelete
  35. Kitchen tools...now I'm in unfamiliar territory!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I liked the waste not want not poster!

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
  37. What a change, when women didn't have to spend time doing this.

    ReplyDelete