Thursday, September 12, 2019

500 Years Of Genius

Leonardo da Vinci: Five Hundred Years Of Genius was the exhibit taking place at the Canada Science And Technology Museum over the summer, marking five centuries since the death of the scientist, artist, philosopher, and outright genius of the Renaissance. In the lobby was a scale model of one of his concepts, a vertical flying machine.


Nearby was a timeline of Leonardo's life and the events that took place over those decades, both personally and in the larger scale of the Renaissance era.


Then I made my way to the exhibit, which was a look at Leonardo from a scientific point of view. This included copies of his works- the originals are too valuable to be moved, or can't be moved- seen in different ways.


These are copies of some of his codices- his thoughts on various subjects that reside in various places in Europe. We carry on with this tomorrow.

37 comments:

  1. Oh, I (and esp hubby) would love to see this exhibit. We have a collection of some of his inventions on the wall. Must be awesome to see the models!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Mona Lisa, Mona Lisa
    Men have named you ... :))
    (Nat King Cole)
    I would be very pleased to visit this exhibition. I saw Mona in the Louvre ...
    But between October 24, 2019 - February 24, 2020 there will be an exhibition with several of his works!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Uma bela exposição sobre o genial Leonard de Vinci, aproveito para desejar a continuação de uma boa semana.

    Andarilhar
    Dedais de Francisco e Idalisa
    O prazer dos livros

    ReplyDelete
  4. You wonder what daVinci could have done with access to today's technology.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Such an amazing person. Wonder who we could consider the 21st century version of him to be.

    Janis
    GDP

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hello, wonderful exhibit. The flying machine is cool! Wishing you a happy day!

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is amazing what they did, isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  8. I can see why you were so keen to see this exhibition William ✨

    ReplyDelete
  9. He was a magnificent man who invented much of what we think of today as having always been around. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a great exhibit. I loved checking out from a library some book that actually showed his writings (which can only can be read in a mirror) and I transcribed some of it, over many hours.

    ReplyDelete
  11. It's good that da Vincis work and writing was kept for us to see.

    ReplyDelete
  12. @Iris: I picked up a few Leonardo related items too.

    @Ella: I spent some time with copies of the Mona Lisa at this exhibit.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @David: He could have thrived in any era.

    @Janis: I'd say Elon Musk, but that guy is something of a jerk.

    @Eileen: I found that machine fascinating.

    @Sandi: he was quite accomplished.

    @Tom: he certainly was.

    @Grace: I couldn't pass it up.

    @DJan: his mind was centuries ahead of its time.

    @RedPat: he certainly did have an imagination.

    @Marie: very much so.

    @Barbara: his writing backwards could be seen on the codices.

    @Nancy: I certainly did.

    @Red: even if a lot of it didn't survive.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I would love to see this exhibit. A few years ago they had a similar exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum that included a lot of De Vinci's papers and drawings. It was fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
  14. very nice. looks very cool to learn & see this. ( ;

    ReplyDelete
  15. That's a wonderful exhibit of an amazing person!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I remember the first time that I saw a Leonardo da Vinci painting in the art museum in DC. I was in total awe! Thank you for sharing this amazing exhibit.

    ReplyDelete
  17. He is one of my all time favorites. I've seen more than one exhibit of his work; I'd love to see this one too.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Glad I wasn't the first up in that flying contraption . . . er . . . machine. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  19. @Karl: that it was.

    @Sharon: I found this fascinating.

    @Beth: I thought so.

    @Tamago: definitely!

    @Denise: that painting is featured here.

    @Jeanie: I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    @Revrunner: as I recall, this one never got past the concept stage.

    ReplyDelete
  20. An amazing man and what a wonderful exhibit.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Neat exhibit.
    There's a documentary recently aired that goes into more depth about da Vinci than I've seen before.

    ReplyDelete
  22. DaVinci's Universal Man has always been useful to me. If you put a ruler in the crook of your elbow and read the length at the bend of your wrist, that number almost always is the length of your foot. As I knit a lot of socks, if I lose my measurement notes, a phone call easily solves my problem.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Oh, I would love to see that exhibit!

    ReplyDelete
  24. I will be posting something myself about Leonardo... but on a slightly different level... ;)

    ReplyDelete
  25. Quite the genius ~ DaVinci ~ Wow ~ great history captured.

    Happy Day to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

    ReplyDelete
  26. He spent more time "inventing" than painting.
    What a genius!

    ReplyDelete
  27. We never did make it to this! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  28. gosh ... did i miss 3 posts? i got them now. sorry to be missing ... hope u r well. ( ;

    ReplyDelete
  29. Read all of your posts on this great exhibit. They showcased Leonardo’s works beautifully. It’s hard to grasp how this man could be a genius in so many ways. What a mind he had.

    ReplyDelete
  30. @Bill: I agree!

    @Maywyn: he led quite a life.

    @Joanne: I have heard that.

    @Lea: I enjoyed it.

    @Kay: very much so!

    @Italiafinlandia: I'll look for it.

    @Carol: thank you!

    @Catarina: indeed.

    @Jennifer: you'd have enjoyed it.

    @Beth: thanks!

    @Sallie: true.

    ReplyDelete