Sunday, August 10, 2014

Voice Of The People

Two things struck me watching this march of protestors with links to the Armenian community. One was the solemness of the occasion, and given the circumstances, that's entirely understandable. The other was one of the banners. It quoted a Turkish leader from years back who noted that healing could begin if his country simply owned up to the truth of what had happened during the Armenian genocide. 

If only.










21 comments:

  1. Interesting report on this protest. I will definitely keep an eye out next year. We have a lot of protests for a range of things though. Although I'm not so "into" political life here.

    ReplyDelete
  2. A composed protest always strike me deeper, but I am not sure Turkey today can do what they rightly ask...

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very interesting. That was a truly awful event. But speaking as one who loves history, I do wonder if the world would be a much better place if we didn't waste so much time looking at events of long ago through the eyes of today, or expecting people to apologise for crimes their ancestors committed - etc. It is - or should be - a different world now.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm glad someone is still protesting in this world. I pass the torch.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yes, if only. The same goes for a great many other peoples in the world...

    ReplyDelete
  6. @Halcyon: I imagine the centennial of it will bring a lot of attention.

    @VP: I don't imagine so either.

    @Mike: that is a persuasive counterargument on the notion.

    @Tex: it is.

    @Birdman: protests are an essential element of democracy.

    @Ciel: that's true.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It does look like a solemn occasion with all the lovely flags. However, I'm embarrassed to say I have absolutely no idea what the protests are about.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I thought sure I had made a comment on this post but it seems to have vanished. I said that I have nothing against protests when they are constructive but sadly, many turn to violence.

    ReplyDelete
  9. @Greensboro: they seem to blend well together.

    @Norma: thank you.

    @Cheryl: check yesterday's post if you didn't see it.

    @Linda: in this case, it's more a display of sadness.

    ReplyDelete
  10. True. I was reminded recently that it wasn't until 1988 that Japanese Americans interned during World War II received any compensation for the losses they suffered, not to mention an apology. By comparison to the Armenians, this is a big deal. In the greater scheme of things it's shameful.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I thought this was a parade at first but then I read your post. Another event that we shake our head at and ask "Why?" Man's inhumanity to man keeps getting repeated.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Would you believe, a family from that horrific event wound up in our county seat in Iowa. They were the only family in town that were as dark complexioned as my mother. One daughter was still in high school when I was and her brother became one of the sheriff deputies.

    ReplyDelete
  13. The world never seems to change!

    ReplyDelete
  14. i agree with the others - i love all the colorful flags. ( :

    ReplyDelete
  15. @Kay: apologies can be decades in the making.

    @Denise: never underestimate the inhumanity of man.

    @Mari: they became refugees for a time. Fortunately their country emerged from being under Soviet rule for decades.

    @RedPat: it doesnt.

    @Beth: the colour does help the pics, I think. I've got something much more lighthearted tomorrow. Though it could get me into trouble.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Mike@ A Bit About Britain hit the nail on the head don't you think William.. we should concentrate on ensuring the future is safe and secure for all .. but realistically knowing the nature of mankind it's never going to happen..

    ReplyDelete
  17. The power of owning up to having done something is certainly awesome. If only!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Too many protests get out of hand. I remember being Marshall for a provincial union protest. Those truckers are some tough dudes, and the student marchers were unable to follow directions, in order for us to adhere to our march parameters. It was scary. Then there is the protest in the US, where a young man was killed, and the anarchists destroy property. They are quite the times...

    ReplyDelete