Thursday, October 15, 2020

New And Old

While some artifacts inside this area of the Museum of History are originals, others are reproductions. A panel here explains why.


Here we have a contemporary ocean going canoe, made in the ways of his ancestors by the Mi'kmaw elder Todd Labrador.


The woodlands people is the next area of interest, and we start with an archaeological find, the McCollum Cache, found at Lake Nipigon in northern Ontario, a find of copper artifacts.


30 comments:

  1. I remember seeing birchbark canoes as a child on a trip to Wisconsin. I was fascinated! And they have that great birch smell.

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  2. Interesting artifacts in the museum.

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  3. On the ocean with such a tiny thing?!

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  4. The canoe is beautiful, but I like those artifact in your last photo as well.

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  5. Hello,

    The canoe is beautiful, another great exhibit. Thanks for sharing.
    Take care and stay safe. Have a happy day!

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  6. No doubt you would have sore arms after a day's paddling.

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  7. It's hard to picture people actually navigating the ocean in that canoe.

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  8. Yes, many things did not have long shelf life. Birchbark canoes did not last very long.

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  9. That's quite a canoe, but I wouldn't want to venture out on to the ocean in such a frail craft.

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  10. The canoe is absolutely beautiful, excellent craftsmanship.

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  11. The canoe is a work of art William and that's quite a cache of copper tools they dug up ✨

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  12. @Linda: they do!

    @Nancy: there are indeed.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Iris: well, relatively. I don't think one goes too far out from land, but if you're crossing from the mainland to an island, or travelling along the coast to a relatively inaccessible area, they'd come in handy.

    @Jan: so do I.

    @Eileen: thanks!

    @David: you would!

    @Tom: definitely.

    @Sharon: and yet they did, in ones like it.

    @Red: fortunately birch was in easy supply.

    @John: I'd probably be wary of it.

    @Maywyn: I agree.

    @Grace: definitely.

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  13. That canoe is a thing of beauty!

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  14. My goodness---what a beautiful canoe---such detail
    MB

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  15. It makes a lot of sense to have reproductions. So many artifacts have been lost.

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  16. The canoe looks rather like a basket ! The items on the last picture seem to be very interesting !

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  17. The canoe is pretty impressive but I don't think I would want to be in the ocean with it.

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  18. Wow, again seems my only word of response.

    How creative these people were, and how I would love to sit down with them and have a conversation.

    As much as museums show, I feel we will never truly know the full truth of their lives, all secrets and stories taken with them.

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  19. The canoe itself is a work of art.

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  20. The birchbark canoe must have been a huge improvement to the heavier dugout.

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  21. That canoe must have been carved out with so much love!

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  22. Very cool! I don't think I've ever seen a canoe close up like this before.

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  23. Beautiful historical canoe and great post ~ ^_^

    Live each moment with love,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  24. I've always been intrigued by birch bark canoes. This is a beauty.

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