Monday, May 10, 2021

Myths And History

 Today we begin with Vulcan At His Forge, a 1750 painting by Pompeo Batoni.

Mythology provides context for this historical painting by Charles Meynier. Wisdom Defending Youth from the Arrows of Love is the title of this 1810 painting.

A portrait with a show stopper of a name. Erneste Bioche de Misery is by Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson, and dates to 1807.

Mythology provides inspiration for Ariadne and Bacchus, an 1821 work by Antoine-Jean Gros.

And finishing today, this is Countess Anna Ivanova Tolystoya, a 1796 painting by Elizabeth Louise Vigee Le Brun.

31 comments:

  1. Bacchus certainly looks alot better than I imagined he would.

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  2. True: mythology provides inspiration for art...

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  3. ...myths and history seems to go hand and hand.

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  4. Beautiful paintings. Interesting to read about the artist and his paintings.

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  5. Beautiful paintings! Have a great day and a happy new week!

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  6. @Amy: perhaps more sober.

    @italiafinlandia: it does.

    @Orvokki: I think so.

    @Tom: that's true.

    @Nancy: it is.

    @Eileen: thank you.

    @Francisco: thanks.

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  7. 'Vulcan At His Forge' is the most appealing painting in this series to me.

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  8. Wonderful! I also keep meaning to say that your header shot is stunning!

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  9. Beautiful paintings, thanks for sharing.

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  10. I really like the portraits that you show, William!

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  11. Interesting to see the mythological theme in some photos.

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  12. Wonderful paintings, William !

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  13. I not familiar with these particular painters. A further research is due...

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  14. @Jan: it's a good one.

    @Denise: thank you.

    @Magiceye: thanks!

    @RedPat: I enjoy showing them.

    @Anvilcloud: it is.

    @Karl: quite so.

    @Catarina: Le Brun had a major retrospective here several years ago.

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  15. There are a lot of muscles on that Vulcan fellow.

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  16. Wonderful art display of the myths we still live with ~ Xo

    Living moment by moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  17. Wisdom defending youth from the arrows of love is one for the ages.

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  18. As I can't read the name of the painter, I think everybody at that time painted the same way!

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  19. @Sharon: he did a lot of physical labour.

    @Carol: thank you.

    @Bill: they are.

    @Marie: it is.

    @Gattina: I can see that.

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  20. I think much of need to explain the presents back then was wrapped in mythology.

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  21. Think of the money you could have made by selling flesh-colored paint.

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  22. wonder why they don't make those kind of dresses any more? would women buy them? they look so fancy. happy week for ya. ( ;

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  23. Erneste Brioche doesn't look all that miserable -- quite lovely an pensive.

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  24. I always like the portraits painted by Mme Vigee Le Brun:)

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  25. My favourite here is the last one, Countess Anna Ivanova Tolystoya.

    All the best Jan

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  26. That's quite a variety. Tell Wisdom it is no use! Youth will love because that is what it does.

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  27. Vulcan is my favorite here.

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