Sunday, September 12, 2021

Home Of Nishga Girl

Here we have a display set of the Far North. Inuit peoples of the North would have used the bones of whales as framing for shelters.


Life on the Great Plains was another way of life, where the bison was central to society. 


More art, and by Alex Janvier again. These four canvases are mounted in one of the high chambers here, and are of a single theme- the seasons. Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter are from top to bottom.


In another of the nearby high chambers is this boat, the Nishga Girl, along with part of a painting in the background. Nishga Girl is the result of a friendship between First Nations and Japanese-Canadian families on the West Coast. The boat now resides here.


The mural, a huge one, once hung in the British American Oil Company headquarters. It now resides here, with the full mural copied onto the display panel at left.


I headed back the way I came. These items on the way out caught my eye.

29 comments:

  1. William - I appreciate seeing the artifacts, new and old, sprung from the culture of the First Nations. We owe them much.

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  2. The clothes remind me of what we have seen from the Sami in northern Scandinavia.

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  3. Many early white explorers and settlers could not have survived without help from First Nations people, and look what we have done to them in return.

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  4. Great items in this part of the exhibition again.

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  5. What a great display of the clothes and items used by the Inuit people.
    Pretty art work and boat. Have a great day and happy new week!

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  6. @Angie: definitely.

    @Marleen: not surprising.

    @David: all too true.

    @Jan: thank you.

    @Eileen: thanks.

    @Francisco: thank you.

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  7. ...native people seen to have lived in harmony with their surroundings.

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  8. We could learn so much from people who can survive in the North.

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  9. Wonderful exhibit, the boat is especially touching.

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  10. I must get to that museum one day.

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  11. They really knew how to make very functional clothing that was warm.

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  12. Wonderful crafts of these First Nations peoples...and I didn't ever think that there were Japanese Canadians. Of course there are! I'd love to see that mural, but it looks a bit hard to photograph!

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  13. The clothing is not only warm and functional but also looks attractive.

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  14. Buen ingenio, tenían a l diseñar la ropa.

    El barco se conserva muy bien y tiene un lugar destacado en el Museo.

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  15. @Tom: so it seems.

    @Marie: definitely.

    @Maywyn: it is.

    @Sharon: I agree.

    @RedPat: you should.

    @Red: they really did.

    @Barbara: I did take a full shot of the mural, but was not satisfied with it.

    @fun60: it does.

    @Bill: it is.

    @Ventana: thanks.

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  16. The Nishga girl is a very important part of history.

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  17. The clothing is absolutely beautiful.

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  18. Excellent items in the exhibition.

    All the best Jan

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