Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Hope, Truth, And Reconciliation

Before starting off today, I'd like to address my neighbours south of the border. I try not to get political here, but on behalf of the majority of the planet, would you please vote that narcissistic, incompetent, dementia ridden con artist out of office today? A return to sanity would be much appreciated.

Carrying on. In April 1980, Terry Fox started what was called the Marathon of Hope, dipping his foot in the Atlantic at St. John's, Newfoundland, and intending to make a run across the country to the west coast to raise money for cancer research. He had lost a leg to the disease, and his quest caught the attention of the country as whole.


He was forced to stop his run near Thunder Bay, and cancer would take his life the following year, but he left a huge legacy behind. Runs in his name continue to raise money each year for the battle against cancer.


One of his shirts is here.


How we relate to our American neighbours is examined as well. The quote accompanying this photograph is from Pierre Trudeau, the father of the current Prime Minister.


The signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement is seen here.


The Museum's concluding area is thematic in nature, with several different themes examined. First we deal with the state of First Nations peoples, through history to the current time. This map shows how many residential schools there were in the country, into the 1990s. Children were taken from their homes, in the attempt to integrate them, regardless of the damage done to them or their families. It is a stain on our history we're still grappling with.


The Truth And Reconciliation Commission was formed to come to terms with the fallout of residential schools. This quotation from its chair is on one of the walls here.


Giniigaaniimenaaning (Looking Ahead) is the title of this stained glass window. It's one of a duplicate pair, with the other placed inside Centre Block on Parliament Hill. It was commissioned to recognize the impact of residential schools on survivors and their families. The artist is Christi Belcourt, done in 2013.


Among the items here is this powow attire I've shown you before. Amanda Larocque is a Mi'kmaq performer of fancy dance, a specific powow style. This is one she's used.

30 comments:

  1. Far more important to me than who wins the presidential election in America, is that the hatred and squabbling over political differences stops. I'd like to see people have more respect for each other, and show it.

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  2. I remember Terry Fox. I'll be glad when the election is over, and I just hope people stay calm. It is going to take a while to undo the damage that's been done.

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  3. We have a similar history here re assimilation of the indigenous people and reconciliation. The pow wow attire is superb 💛

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  4. Many people across the pond share your views about today's election. The story of Terry Fox is an inspiration to us all.

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  5. Terry Fox was an inspiration. What a beautiful story to share.

    Love that costume, so vibrant.

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  6. Here in Norway we are very concerned about the election :)We will all look at it tonight

    That running man Terry Fox what a great man..So full of strenght to go on.Sadly he passed away!

    Wish you a great day!

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  7. Nice post, William, especially the beginning was impressive. I wholeheartedly support your appeal to your southern neighbors to send that idiot home. Let us hope that the USA will soon return to decent standards and values. Although I am not very confident about that.

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  8. I wish the same, he should be locked in a mad house ! Interesting post !

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  9. Interesting post William, the world has't become better in the last few years.....

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  10. Let's hope your neighbors vote with wisdom... :)

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  11. In a nation not noted for singling out its heroes, Terry Fox stands out above all others, and for the very best of reasons, not related in any way to militaristic, xenophobic or jingoistic reasons, and thank goodness for that.

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  12. @Maywyn: it's going to take a lot of work.

    @Linda:it will.

    @Grace: I agree.

    @fun60: quite true.

    @Gemel: thank you.

    @Anita: he left behind such a big legacy.

    @Francisco: thank you.

    @Jan: I hope so.

    @Gattina: thank you.

    @Marianne: it hasn't.

    @Italiafinlandia: hopefully.

    @David: I quite agree.

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  13. Nice description of that ugly orange... Hope he is history very soon.
    Oh, cancer...

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  14. Hello,

    I have hope our country will heal and unite. Interesting exhibit and a great post. Take care! Have a happy new week!

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  15. Terry Fox and his story is so inspiring! One of the most famous and influential Canadians.

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  16. ...and I too hope for a return to sanity!

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  17. Thanks for introducing me to Terry Fox.

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  18. What a brave young man was Terry Fox.

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  19. I like your header!
    I like your first paragraph.
    I remember Terry Fox.
    The powow attire is impressive.

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  20. We need lots more truth in this little old world. Then we can talk about reconciliation. Some how we have completely lost our relationship with truth. We are ready to believe any crap.

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  21. The pow wow regalia is always amazing!

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  22. Terry Fox was amazing. He showed us that one person can have an effect on the world around them.

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  23. Terry Fox is an inspiration to us all, William.

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  24. What a wonderful inspiration Terry Fox's story is. I remember when he started that run.

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  25. @Iris: cancer is a disease that touches everyone, one way or another.

    @Eileen: I hope so too.

    @Marie: very much so.

    @Tom: definitely.

    @DJan: you're welcome.

    @Sharon: he really was.

    @Catarina: thank you!

    @Red: I agree.

    @Jennifer: indeed.

    @RedPat: yes he did.

    @Karl: he very much is.

    @Bill: he touched so many lives.

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  26. I know it's redundant but what a great museum. And Terry Fox -- now that's courage.

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  27. Thanks for the hope we straighten out our presidency, though I doubt the orange one reads you. Or even reads.

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  28. Terry Fox - a man of hope and conviction!
    Love that costume too!

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  29. Terry Fox ~ most inspirational ~

    Live each moment with love,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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