Thursday, January 28, 2021

Seeing And Not Being Seen

 It has been noted in my comments that a gallery like this allows one to look at a bird in ways that can't be done in the wild. A little bird coming to your hand for seed on an open palm just doesn't stay still for long.


This case examines bird vision, as well as the ways birds blend in.


We'll pick up here tomorrow with this display case that focuses on bird vocalization.

24 comments:

  1. Bird vision is a remarkable thing.

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  2. Those who arranged the displays did a very good job!

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  3. You keep giving me more reasons to get back there, William.

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  4. Love the owls. I hope to see one this winter. No luck so far.

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  5. ...in nature some birds fly around so quickly that they are hard to view.

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  6. That owl looks ready to fly our of his box!

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  7. @Linda: it is.

    @Cloudia: thanks!

    @Ella: they did indeed.

    @David: good.

    @Marie: hopefully.

    @Magiceye: indeed.

    @Tom: definitely.

    @Jeanie: it does.

    @DJan: me too.

    @RedPat: I agree.

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  8. Awesome bird photos ~ Happy Day to You ~ be well.

    Moment by moment,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  9. Having the birds eat out of your hand would be fun. There is a place in Tucson that has a hummingbird pavilion where people go inside that hummingbirds fly around very close to the people inside. I haven't been there in a long time but I love going in and just sitting and watching them.

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  10. I was so thrilled yesterday to see some robins flying about and maybe some crows, as well as the usual sparrows. Then a cold front came through last night, and it's windy, and no birds are around in our trees. I hope they're like your displayed birds, safely tucked away where it's warmer...waiting for spring time.

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  11. That’s true, although I have a post on my deck and if I sit real still they will come down and eat right in front of me.

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  12. Birders these days have high end cameras and take photos and then we can look at the bird for a long time. Birding has gone high tech. There's also and app to identify the bird.

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  13. the whole series on birds is very interesting and informative covering different aspects of anatomy and life. I agree - this kind of display allows one to look at a bird in ways that can't be done in the wild. I have difficulties shooting birds from afar, let alone closer.

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  14. Reminds me of the hawk I saw yesterday on my walk that settled on a limb not more than 12 feet from me.

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  15. @Carol: thanks!

    @Sharon: hummers are amazing birds.

    @Barbara: most are lying low here.

    @Janey: that is a treat.

    @Red: tech helps.

    @Bill: I agree.

    @Klara: me too.

    @Revrunner: I have photographed a hawk up close.

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  16. William - displaying and studying birds is good for education and science. I just hope that they were found dead and then displayed, rather than killed ...

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  17. It's fascinating the way birds blend into their environment William, especially the owls ✨

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  18. hey, u have a great weekend. so cold here. i wonder if u r having snow? take care. ( ;

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  19. Birds are fascinating aren't they?:)

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