Thursday, November 12, 2015

A Pair Of Monuments

This monument can be found along Sussex Drive in Ottawa. It commemorates the Canadians who fought, died, and were imprisoned during and following the Battle of Hong Kong. At the same time as the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, their military struck several other targets across the Pacific on December 7th and 8th, 1941. One of those locations was the British colony of Hong Kong, where Canadian troops had been among those garrisoned to defend the place at the time. The names of all those who had served are inscribed on this monument, and those who died during the battle or afterwards in the POW camps are marked with crosses to denote their fate.


On October 22nd, a ceremony was held at the National War Memorial to mark the one year anniversary of the killing of Corporal Nathan Cirillo while on duty as a sentry here, as well as the anniversary of the killing of Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent in Quebec on the 20th of October, 2014. A plaque for Corporal Cirillo was unveiled here as well on that date, set alongside the edge of the Memorial's lawn. It's an ideal location- looking up from here you get a full view of the Memorial, and sentries taking their duty shift pass by this spot as they go to and from their posts.

32 comments:

  1. so many lives lost and affected by war.

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  2. His memory is fair and deserved.

    Tomás.

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  3. gorgeous war remembrance wreaths. so pretty. ( :

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  4. sad that we have to have these monuments :(

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  5. There are a lot of asterix there William.

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  6. @Tex: too many.

    @Linda: I was impressed by both of them.

    @Tomas: it was a good idea to add the plaque for Cpl. Cirillo here.

    @Janey: it is.

    @Beth: I certainly thought so.

    @Hilary: it is.

    @Tanya: true.

    @Grace: a whole lot. Hong Kong and its aftermath were horrendous.

    @Norma: I certainly thought so.

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  7. A memorial in remembrance of those who sacrificed their lives..

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  8. It's good that we have memorials to mark the service and sacrifice of our forces. the Nathan Cirillo marker would bring many tears.

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  9. Great tribute, Wiiliam. Amazing reflections on the 3rd pic!

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  10. It is a fitting memorial, very poignant and your post is very moving.

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  11. Seeing all the names never fails to make me shudder...

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  12. @Nancy: both really are effective at demonstrating the cost of war.

    @Red: I liked during the service yesterday, the rabbi delivering the benediction mentioning last year. He's an eloquent speaker, and he's been involved in the ceremonies for several years.

    @VP: indeed.

    @Jennifer: the Hong Kong memorial was a bit of a surprise. I came across it while taking a bit of a different route to Rideau Hall in October- if you were on the far side of Sussex Drive, and you weren't looking directly at it, it's easy to miss, but once you know it's there, you can't miss it.

    @Jose: thank you.

    @Denise: thanks.

    @Marleen: I certainly thought so of both.

    @Halcyon: indeed.

    @Whisk: too many.

    @Ciel: me too.

    @RedPat: it is.

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  13. I think the whole world remembers.

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  14. For once I'm stuck for words William, very well done for posting...

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  15. Wonderful memorials. So many lives lost.

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  16. A beautiful and respectful post. Gave me chills.

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  17. The battles of WW2 (& WW1 for that matter) were bad enough. The treatment of the POWs in WW2 was horrific.

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  18. How well we all remember that day a year ago. Like the reflection pic.

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  19. @Revrunner: I think so too.

    @Geoff: thanks.

    @Pamela: and so many young men having the prime of their lives shattered.

    @Mari: both are, yes.

    @Debs: I knew both of these memorials would work well together as a post.

    @Kay: absolutely.

    @EG: definitely.

    @Jackie: that day in October 2014 is one that'll stay in so many minds.

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  20. A moving display of the plaques and wreaths.

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