Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Angel Square And Anglesea Square

I was up in Lowertown in late August, looking for a specific area. The neighbourhood has a lot of history, dating back before Confederation, and much of that history has been that of a working class area. A stop at St. Clement Parish and a word with one of the parish members directed me to where I wanted to be, an area behind the church. This community centre was there.


The nearby park is Jules Morin Park, though back in the day this area was called Anglesea Square. Children's author Brian Doyle, who grew up in this area and attended York Street Public School, has often incorporated the Ottawa Valley into his books. This area in particular he gave the nickname Angel Square for a book of that name, set in the period of the 1940s, involving a schoolboy coming to grips with prejudice and injustice. The neighbourhood has changed since that era- the apartment blocks are more recent, and this playground and park occupy the square, looking quite new. York Street School is still there- Doyle weaved it into his books- though the neighbouring Ste. Anne Catholic School looks more modern than the 1940s era of Angel Square. 

30 comments:

  1. It looks like the neighborhood has a nice mixture of old and new.

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  2. Soon you will talk about the Gerber´s plan ? ... Just kidding.

    Tomás.

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  3. Seems to be a calm place for a family to live.

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  4. Seems a very quiete place to live there.

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  5. An inviting playground and pretty old school.

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  6. A relaxing view and a place inspiring calm and quiet...

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  7. I like that last photo especially, the building looks similar to a school here in Montreal.

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  8. An interesting mix of old and new here William, would I be right in saying more new than o!d ?

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  9. It looks like a nice neighbourhood and playgrounds are always a sign of growth (and kids). ;) I like the old school - very classic for it's era.

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  10. It all looks very neat. Impressive school building!

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  11. Looks like a good area for long walks.

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  12. when are u 2 old 2 play on the playground? looks like fun. ( ;

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  13. Playground equipment is much better than it used to be.

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  14. Brian Doyle sounds familiar as I was given a box of books on young fiction to evaluate each year. I will have to look him up and see which books I read. Interseting how you show the changes that slowly grind along.

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  15. @Kay: yes, some houses you can see were built well after the Forties, but some date back a century or more. Lowertown's been a part of the city from the earliest days.

    @Tomas: not likely!

    @Stuart: I think the park's a good sign... and it seems pretty well looked after, which is a good thing.

    @Marianne: this area has quite a turbulent history. In the 19th century, Lowertown could be a violent place.

    @Janey: I really like the architectural style of York Street school. Ste. Anne reminds me of more recent architecture for schools.

    @VP: it was fairly quiet this day, though it's not obvious that there's a splash pool in this park that was busy that day.

    @Linda: I imagine it was a well used style in the 1920s when this school was built.

    @Grace: it's more of a mix. Some newer, some quite older.

    @Pamela: I'd passed by the west side of that school many times while going from one spot to the other, but only once or twice by its main entrance. I think a year or two ago I'd passed by it, perhaps, and then this last time.

    @Mike: I think York St. School stands out nicely.

    @Sharon: and I do tend to take long walks!

    @Beth: a good question!

    @Norma: it is, yes.

    @Red: I highly recommend Angel Square.

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  16. looks like a good place to be a kid. :)

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  17. That looks very nice area. The swing in the playground looks interesting. If I were there, I might join kids to play :-)

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  18. That does look like a school! And the 'towering' middle of the building even looks a bit Yorkish...

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  19. You found a very quiet moment!

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  20. You picked a quiet time for your visit, William!

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  21. Amazing there were no kids out there. That looks like a nice playground.

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  22. Nice area of town. I'd love to visit there. That last photo looks like one of the high schools that I attended.

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  23. Fascinating stuff William, you always come up with interesting facts...

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  24. @Tex: I think so!

    @Tamago: I find myself wondering when the park got its last updates... things look quite new indeed.

    @Ciel: the architecture of the place suits me.

    @Marleen: everyone that was in the park that day seemed to be in the splash pool!

    @RedPat: deceptively so from these photos. I do recall it was a pretty hot day.

    @Halcyon: they were busy in the pool!

    @Lowell: my high school was a product, I think, of 1960s architecture.

    @Geoff: thank you!

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  25. the play ground begs to be played on. it looks lonely without children or me ;-)

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  26. A lovely neighborhood. You've intrigued me about the Angel Square book. I'll have to check that out.

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  27. The schools look much like schools I went to.

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  28. The playground looks fun for kiddos.

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  29. It's fun to see an area that has been written about in novels.

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  30. That last pic of the school looks like the high-school I went too.

    Now they have kept the entrance of R. H. King and build a new.
    If interested to look on the Browser. Put R.H. King High-school. You will see the entrance has been kept William.

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