Monday, August 15, 2022

Lovely Misery

This work is a new acquisition for the gallery, and you would have seen it in yesterday's post. It looks like a painting, especially at a distance, but it's not. Saffronia is a 2017 photograph by Ayana M. Jackson, a self portrait by the artist in period clothing that features a woman of colour in a position she would not have been in two hundred years ago- a place of leisure and empowerment, dressed in finery, posed like many a woman of that period. It's a political commentary- and it fits right in here among the old oil paintings. It made quite an impression.


Charles Meynier painted Wisdom Defending Youth From The Arrows Of Love in 1810.


Here we have the lady of the title of today's post. Erneste Bioche de Misery is the title of this portrait by Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson, done in 1807.


Antoine-Jean Gros painted Bacchus and Ariadne in 1821.


Another French artist, famed for her portrait work, was Elizabeth Vigee Le Brun. She left France when the Revolution broke out. This is her 1796 painting, Countess Anna Ivanova Tolstoya.


Pierre-Paul Prud'hon painted this in 1809, titled Love Seduces Innocence, Pleasure Entraps, and Remorse Follows.

32 comments:

  1. Another interesting page in the history of art.

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  2. Lovely exhibit and art work. Take care, enjoy your day and the new week ahead.

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  3. These paintings are just amazingly good.

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  4. These are beautiful paintings. Have a great week.

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  5. A simple vista el primero de los cuadros, parece una pintura y nadie sospecharía que se trata de una fotografía.
    Mucho arte hay en esas fotografías.

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  6. So many beautiful works. The social commentary of the first one should not be lost on anyone.

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  7. ...and sometimes misery loves company.

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  8. That’s an interesting photo that could fool people and also make them think.

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  9. @Italiafinlandia: very much so.

    @Eileen: thank you.

    @roentare: indeed.

    @Nancy: I agree.

    @Ventana: thank you.

    @David: I really liked it.

    @Francisco: thanks.

    @Tom: well put.

    @anvilcloud: indeed.

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  10. The photograph is thought provoking!

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  11. Pleased to see work by female artists which we don't often see.

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  12. It was good to see some female artists.

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  13. I love that top photograph. It's wonderful.

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  14. The 'photograph' is awesome ~ other classical paintings well photographed ~

    Wishing you good health, laughter and love,

    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  15. @Marie: definitely.

    @Fun60: that's true.

    @RedPat: indeed.

    @Sharon: me too.

    @Carol: thanks!

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  16. Safronia is a very striking piece. It's a wonderful addition to the collection.

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  17. I am so impressed with the first brilliant work of photographic art and the statement the artist and subject make. I wondered about the title of your post and still do after I scrolled down to see that painting.

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  18. That first piece is interesting. I keep hoping things are changing, but then...

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  19. Another fascinating exhibit, and I was very taken with the first photograph and self-portrait of Ayana M. Jackson. Very powerful image!

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  20. That photograph is stunning.

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  21. The 1st one is my favourite of the day!

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  22. I really like the first portrait and I also always like the work of Mme Vigee Le Brun:)

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