Tuesday, November 12, 2013

If Ye Break Faith

Coming into the Memorial Chamber, this carving stands over the entrance, a nod to animals etched into the stone. 


Through the short passage inside, looking up, this is the arch above the entrance within the room


I mentioned last time about inscriptions of poetry carved onto the walls of the room. This is one such example.


While this is another: John McCrae's immortal poem In Flanders Fields.


Higher up on the walls are stained glass windows letting in light below.



It is a solemn space, sacred ground, really. I always feel humbled being here, seeing the names of those men in these display cases.


24 comments:

  1. Well, it is a wonderful way to remember the fallen, even though they probably don't care much...

    Why is the light reddish coming through the windows that apparently aren't stained glass?

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    1. On that side of the room, the glass is not looking out onto the outdoors. There's part of the building beyond it, so the glass is illuminated from behind, hence the light being red. I'm not sure if that varies though.

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  2. In Flanders Fields... how appropriate! And on a side note, just how long did it take to do all of that carving, I wonder.

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    1. Some of the carving went on for many years, even after the buildings themselves were erected.

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  3. Another wonderful post, William!

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  4. Can't go wrong with animals cut in stone ! What a beautiful place.

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    1. Wait til I get over to the Museum of Nature...

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  5. I can believe it took years to do all this! Lovely place!

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  6. What a beautiful display--buildings, carvings, etchings and honoring the fallen.
    Flanders fields is one of my all time favorite poems. Thanks Canada!
    MB

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  7. Ah, poetry! Flanders Fields is memorable and part of my childhood.

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