Thursday, November 14, 2013

Tomb Of The Unknown Soldier

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was placed at the foot of the War Memorial several years ago. The body of a Canadian soldier who fell at the Battle of Vimy Ridge during the First World War was repatriated and placed here. Starting several years ago, the public began a tradition on Remembrance Day to place poppies on the tomb. Thousands of people doing that will take awhile; we headed off to warm up for a bit before coming back to the Memorial.



During the placing of wreaths during the service, aside from the official wreaths placed at front (you saw one of them yesterday), many other wreaths are placed around the sides of the Memorial. They come from veterans groups, government agencies, aboriginal groups, community associations, and ambassadors from the diplomatic community. 





From here, we went off to the War Museum, with one stop across from it. I'll show you why tomorrow.

26 comments:

  1. I love the British poppies tradition, I had no idea that it existed in Canada too but then again I suppose it's logical.
    Is it a terrible thing to say that it looks pretty?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Traditions are so important to a country. They bring us all together, at least for a little while.

    ReplyDelete
  3. so similar to arlington..and we do poppies here too. i didn't know it was a british tradition!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I must see the tomb at Arlington... the whole cemetery, really, but that one particularly.

      Delete
  4. We use poppies here too, but usually as a lapel flower; however I don't recall seeing this year. Great shots and interesting information.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're worn as lapel flowers here too; I pick up several each fall.

      Delete
  5. Your first commenter said what I've thought many times: Is it a terrible thing to say that it looks pretty? There's something tranquil yet heroic, peaceful yet pretty about how the simple poppy expresses so much beyond words, both for the individual and the country.

    May they rest in peace.

    (Stopped by your Dog Post -- thanks for the morning chuckles!)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Nice tradition. I think the words from the first comment says what we all think about it. Thank You William.

    ReplyDelete
  7. So that's where the poppies come from...the guys from the Salvation Army give poppies for donations here.

    ReplyDelete
  8. It makes me sad and glad to see all those wreaths. Good that communities remember, but sad that so many have lost their lives in wars.

    ReplyDelete
  9. For me it highlights the stupidity of war. Why do we send all our best young men to either die or return traumatised for political chess playing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And in some ways, that never seems to change.

      Delete
  10. What a colorful tradition. I remember the poppies from when I was a kid in Canada but I did see a few here this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like that placing the poppies on the tomb was a spontaneous act of the public, not an idea dreamed up by someone in one of the government ministries. It seems much more fitting.

      Delete