Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Journeying Back Into History

After passing through the exhibits on First Nations people, the visitor comes up to Canada Hall, which picks up the story from European contact onwards through a series of displays and artifacts that take the story of the country through time. There's been much of an emphasis on social history- perhaps one reason Darth Harper and his minions have been so eager to muck around with the museum's mandate.

This is a cross section reproduction of an Acadian dike.


While this is a recreation of a tavern in New France.


The architecture of New France gets reproduced here as the visitor walks through, including churches, homes, and the everyday items of the time.


This house stands in the next section beyond the New France era, typical of 19th century style.


A parlour is inside the house, decorated according to the fashions of the period.



38 comments:

  1. I am really enjoying this journey back in time!

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  2. That was quite a project to recreate these places.
    Thanks for sharing this history.

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  3. This is great, I love museums where you get the 'feel' of what life used to be like. I hope the history of the Acadians and their expulsions is told there.

    I've only been to Canada once, Québec to be more precise, and I enjoyed Pierre Chauvin's trading post in Tadoussac very much and loved the architecture of Québec's place royale which very much reminded me of Brittany. Which wasn't surprising.

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  4. Nice to see the improvement of the place!

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  5. The history and destiny of the Acadians in Canada has always fascinated me.

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  6. Looks absolutely fascinating. You actually have someone called 'Darth' over there? What WERE his parents thinking? Had they been on the juice?!

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  7. Interesting . Nice shots , Thanks for sharing have a good day !

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  8. I would love to see the New France exhibits. I'm wondering how much life differed in Lower Canada from life in Upper Canada.

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  9. Linda: thanks!

    Pat: you're welcome.

    Ciel: yes it does go into the aspects of the expulsion.

    Weekend: thank you.

    Merisi: me too.

    Bibi: so do I!

    Mike: it is my term of derision for the prime minister. I don't like what he is doing to my country.

    Country gal: thank you!

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  10. So much to see there! Ottawa is a great place..if you don't include Government.
    Jane x

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  11. i love these! my ancestors settled in new france! i like seeing how they lived!

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  12. This is fascinating. And you're doing consistently excellent photography, William!

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  13. new france - sounds like a perfect name for the 'new' settlement.

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  14. This is a marvelous exhibition. My mother-in-law's family were French-Canadians who used to make ladies rouge for a living. More great photos William, thank you!

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  15. @EG: in some ways, quite similar, in others, different. The change in church denominations would have been huge.

    @Jane and Chris: yes, the government tends to be really annoying, particularly the current regime.

    @Tanya: thanks!

    @Norma: thank you!

    @Luis: thanks!

    @Tex: it certainly does!

    @Denise: you're welcome!

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  16. What an absolutely fantastic place.

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  17. This must be a great place for historical enthusiasts to visit! Hope I can make it there one day!

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  18. I confess that this is a part of history I do not know well, this place looks very interesting!

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  19. It's like having a little town inside the museum.

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  20. @Mari: it is!

    @Judy: I think so!

    @Cheryl: I hope so too!

    @VP: it's something I'm quite familiar with, but I've taken a lot of history courses!

    @Sharon: it really is, and a town that shifts forward in time, at that.

    @Stuart: thank you!

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  21. Wonderful exhibit, I like especially the photo of the tavern :)

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  22. I'm enjoying this tour! I love museums with these sorts of recreations. I've seen two in B.C. with similar approaches in Victoria and Vancouver. It seems to make history more real.

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  23. Great that they have 'real' homes in there! You've given us a great tour of the museum.

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  24. This reminds me of a museum in Japan where you could walk through a traditional village. Very interesting way to learn about life back then!

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  25. Oh that's so amazing! You would die if you saw Mt. Vernon here in MD. They have everything so well preserved, along with the writing desk George Washington sat at every morning while he lived there.

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  26. I think I took students here the first time I visited, but I don't remember!
    We plan on touring Vancouver, and hope to seem some more great museums.
    Smiths Falls, despite being in a recession, has some fabulous museums. You might like them, if you haven't been.
    (ツ) from Cottage Country Ontario , Perth!

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  27. @Karl: that was a shot I definitely wanted to take.

    @Kay: it always works for me as I go through.

    @RedPat: thanks!

    @Meradeth: I hope the changes the museum are going to make won't affect this area too much.

    @Krisztina: I would enjoy that a lot!

    @Jennifer: you no doubt have. And I've been to Smith's Falls on numerous occasions, and have stopped in at the Heritage House and that railway museum.

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  28. This was possibly my favourite part of the museum (apart from the building itself and the totem poles) You do a great photo tour; I'm always forgetting when I'm at events or exhibits!

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  29. These are very interesting exhibits. I like the architectural examples.

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  30. I like things like this! My favorite picture here is the tavern.

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  31. I'm just now catching up on all of your posts from the museum as I was out of town over the weekend and didn't get to do much blogging. All of the pictures are wonderful. I just love the totem poles in the previous posts. The picture of the parlor is my favorite in this post. I love that tea set!

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  32. I love the picture of the parlour! Beautiful!

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  33. My husband's ancestors came from France to Canada to a place called Three Rivers--Quebec area I think. Some stayed and others came to the US. I love looking at the furnished homes or rooms. Peeking at our past. MB

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