Thursday, April 3, 2014

A Beloved Oak, Sailing Through Time

I have shown you a woodcarving before in this post. That sculpture, still standing in the Convention Centre until a summit later in the year, comes from the same tree that provided the wood for the sculpture below, which was the first sculpture carved out of the wood. The work was done by David Fels, incorporating the wood from the dead Brighton Oak. You can check out the original look of the tree at this link, and Fels himself talks about the process of carving that second sculpture from the earlier post at this link. The sculpture itself stands in the River Building at Carleton University.






40 comments:

  1. That is quite a sculpture...now heading to the link you provided.

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  2. It's gorgeous but then I'm a sucker for wood.

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  3. A wonderful sculpture... massive and delicate looking at the same time.

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  4. Imaginative piece, which I like. (What I heard of the 1,000 year long piece of music I mentioned yesterday suggested it's an ambient piece William, almost like listening to nature- wonderful stuff).

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  5. I especially enjoy when "dead wood" is brought back to life in this way.

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  6. Amazing, really. I find it fascinating how carvers can cut so many shapes and curves into one piece of wood.

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  7. An especially interesting post. The carver is extra-ordinarily talented. I love wood, so this, in my opinion is spectacular!

    And your comment about "well-regulated" was right on!

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  8. Linda: I do like it.

    Ciel: you're not the only one.

    Stuart: quite a contradiction!

    Babzy: I think so!

    Chrissy: ah that explains it.

    Revrunner: I lived a couple of blocks from the tree, so I remember it well!

    Tex: indeed.

    Tanya: yes!

    EG: it is a lot of work!

    Lowell: I wonder if there is more wood to work with.

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  9. The angle of your first shot made me think it was some funky shoe.

    I really love how he showed off the texture of the wood!

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  10. What a very interesting link William, really enjoyed the story of the oak tree. Nice to know these wonderful sculptures are a legacy to its memory.

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  11. What an interesting way to keep the tree "alive."

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  12. An amazing and very creative sculpture. The craftsmanship of the author is simply amazing and I liked the story of the tree. My compliments to David Fels!

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  13. quite amazing that they can sculpt out of old trees

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  14. Beautiful use of the wood. Wood is so beautiful. MB

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  15. Could there be a more fitting memorial of a stately tree than these sculptures? Beautiful.

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  16. @Hilda: oh, yes, I can definitely see that in the first shot.

    @Furry Gnome: he's done great work with both sculptures.

    @Jane and Chris: it's beyond my talents!

    @Grace: it's far better than to just carve the tree up for firewood.

    @Norma: it certainly is.

    @VP: I'm sure he's gotten plenty of compliments for his work!

    @Gerald: it certainly is.

    @MB: I think so too.

    @Merisi: most definitely.

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  17. What an amazing wooden sculpture, I don't think I've seen such a sculpture before.

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  18. An admirable way to use a dead tree!

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  19. It's amazing what he did with that old tree! It's a beautiful sculpture.

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  20. Wood is a perfect material. I like wooden sculptures.

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  21. A beautiful way to keep the tree alive.

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  22. Brilliant! So many old dead and dying trees become firewood. This sculptor makes them into something precious with real respect for the time and beauty of wood. The sculptures are amazing. It's clear he has reverence for the material he's working with.

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  23. Wood is not dead. This artist just gave it a different life of motion.

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  24. It is beautiful and a wonderful way for the old tree to live on and provide enjoyment for so many.

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  25. @Jan: he did such extraordinary work with it.

    @Sharon: that seems to be the consensus.

    @Mo: quite so!

    @Cheryl: yes it is.

    @Halcyon: I've thought so since I first saw it.

    @Inna: so do I.

    @RedPat: and it remains accessible to the public this way.

    @Bibi: that's true.

    @Kay: that comes across in his work.

    @Mari: very well said.

    @Lois: it's very visually appealing, and it carries on in such a good way.

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  26. It's a striking sculpture. And thanks for the good links.

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  27. Both pieces are beautiful. That tree was amazing. Too bad it was damaged, but the final result us pretty nice too.

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  28. Nice to see that the oak was re-purposed and can be enjoyed by so many now as a piece of art.

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  29. I love any of the sculptures I see carved out of wood. It is magnificent!

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  30. @Krisztina: thanks!

    @Petrea: you're welcome.

    @Barbara: it was quite a tree in its time. Making use of it in this fashion has been worthwhile.

    @Beatrice: it's such a good piece of art.

    @Denise: I've always enjoyed it.

    @Karl: so do I.

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