Friday, August 5, 2016

Remembering The Fallen Of War

The War Memorial was officially dedicated in 1939, mere months before the outbreak of World War Two. These panels include the dedication, attended by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. This marked the first royal walkabout that has become a tradition ever since- the king and queen were scheduled to leave after the ceremony, and instead spent time speaking with veterans. 

24 comments:

  1. Nice series, William, and I am glad they stayed to speak with the veterans.

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  2. Interesting pictures op the old king and queen. Seems so long ago as their child is alraedy 90 years old!

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  3. I'm sure that the veterans were happy that the royals stayed and talked with them.

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  4. It's fun to look back on the ribbon-cutting events. But sad that we still need these kind of memorials.

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  5. i love looking back at the way folks use to dress in the good ole' days! such fashion. ( ;

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  6. @Linda: it was a very good decision.

    @Marianne: time flies.

    @Bill: indeed.

    @Halcyon: that's true.

    @Beth: they did dress differently.

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  7. so sad to have a memorial finished just before the next huge war outbreak.

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  8. there is a lot of history represented here.

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  9. That's an interesting story. And ironic...as TexWisGirl mentioned, to complete one memorial as the need for another is in process...

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  10. Nice series of the ceremony. We can all do without wars.

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  11. It was a rather sad situation where the monument was set up just before the next war. It is a rather large monument.

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  12. @Tex: the storm clouds were brewing in Europe.

    @Sharon: there certainly is.

    @Lowell: it's a good way to start such a tradition.

    @Nancy: we can, but so often we fall to such measures.

    @Red: it is a very large monument, not just the granite itself, but the surroundings as well.

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  13. Great old pictures. the one of the grieving mother is sobering.

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  14. I find all war memorials very sad and too bad we have them.
    John Lennon's "Imagine" will do.
    MB

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  15. learned a lot more history here, William, and agree with another comment that it's indeed sad to have to have these memorials.

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  16. Fascinating stuff. I've always said that Canada does this kind of thing exceptionally well. Though I do agree it is a shame we have to remember in this way.

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  17. The Royals were wise to spend time visiting with the veterans. They must have developed a more direct appreciation for the sacrifices soldiers made, and they gained good will among those who served.

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  18. @Janey: the Silver Cross mother is chosen each year to represent mothers of the country who have lost children serving in the military.

    @MB: that's true.

    @Beatrice: but necessary.

    @Mike: this is done quite well with this memorial.

    @Whisk: thank you.

    @Jack: it was exactly the right move, but then that was what George and Elizabeth were known for. One wonders if the Royals would still be in their position if Edward hadn't abdicated. Unlike his brother, he had no good instinct.

    @Jan: they do, yes. I'll finish this series tomorrow.

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  19. Just read about how the Hirshhorn Museum here in D.C. brought in a sculpture by helicopter and placed it in an outdoor garden.

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  20. A shame there had to be more memorials.

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  21. The grieving mother photo says so much. It's unfortunate that memorials don't include a measure of the despondence of the grieving.

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