Thursday, August 4, 2016

The Building Of The War Memorial

While work proceeds on the War Memorial, on two portions of the surrounding temporary wall, a series of panels are in place about the history of the Memorial itself. These panels were on display nearby on Plaza Bridge a year or two ago, so it was a surprise to see them. The Memorial, also called The Response, was designed and overseen by sculptor Vernon March, and his siblings picked up his work after his death in 1930. While it was built to honour the dead of the First World War, it has since done the same for those of the Second World War, the Korean War, and other conflicts. I have more from here to come.

20 comments:

  1. Great record of the events surrounding the Memorial

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  2. It was good the sculptor's work was seen to completion by his siblings.

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  3. the architecture of the building in the last shot. that is amazing. is that still around? love all the roof details. ( :

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  4. The sculpture Response is beautiful William, love the black and white photos!

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  5. You've really got to embiggen the photos to get their full impact. It looks like a super memorial, William.

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  6. Something interesting to study while construction is going on.

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  7. Information is key when development goes on. It's good that this is not a static memorial but continues as other events happen.

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  8. It's great that his work was continued after he passed away.

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  9. @Linda: thanks!

    @Bill: it was quite a process to make it.

    @Nancy: I imagine he would have loved to see it finished.

    @Beth: oh yes, that's the East Block of Parliament, which is little changed. The building appearing in the fourth shot, however, is gone, replaced by the current main post office building. And the roads and parking lot there were reconfigured for the building of the Memorial.

    @Grace: the Memorial has the right somber touch.

    @Norma: thanks!

    @Lowell: it was a trade off with these as to if the text or the period photos were more important.

    @Sharon: it does liven up what's otherwise blank walls.

    @Red: there are a number of tourist information officers who usually are posted by the Memorial, since it's such a high pedestrian traffic area. At present they're spending this summer around the Valiants memorials, which is close by. They're all very handy in terms of information.

    @Bill: thanks!

    @Marleen: it did need to be finished, after all.

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  10. More evidence of a great people!

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  11. Gosh! Wouldn't it be nice if there were no need for such memorials?

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  12. Those panels tell a great piece of history.

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  13. Those top photos remind us of the great numbers of people involved in the effort. Everyone's life was touched.

    Janis
    GDP

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  14. Displays like this are important in making sure history isn't forgotten.

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  15. I have to agree that memorial such as this are very important. I look forward to seeing your other photos from this memorial. Do you know where the plaques will go after the work is completed?

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  16. @Cloudia: indeed.

    @Revrunner: it would.

    @Jan: they do, yes.

    @Janis: so many were.

    @Kay: that is true.

    @Anita: I think they must be stored away, perhaps with Canadian Heritage or Library and Archives Canada.

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  17. I always appreciate well-made explanatory panels when I visit a place of interest. They help put the place in its context.

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