Sunday, April 7, 2019

Life Up In Low Gravity Orbit

A current day astronaut suit can be found among the exhibits here.


Life in space means hard work, but if you need a second opinion, mission control is always standing by to lend a hand.


Tools in space or the Canadarm2 occupy nearby panels.


The human body is not designed for life in low gravity, and extended time in space can wreck havoc with one's physiology. And so part of every astronaut's routine is daily exercise, for hours, on machines that compensate for low gravity.


A lot of the work carried out on the ISS includes experimentation, done by the astronauts in collaboration with colleagues below. I found the panels fascinating. We carry on with this tomorrow.

30 comments:

  1. Even after all these years, it's remarkable.

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  2. I wonder if we'll ever accept all this as normal; it still seems like sci-fi to me even though it's been going on for most of my life.

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  3. Awesome. Did you know with Alexander Gerst Die Maus was on the ISS, too?

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  4. @Linda: it is.

    @Italiafinlandia: true!

    @Jan: i certainly agree.

    @John: sci fi fits it.

    @Iris: I did not.

    @Francisco: thanks!

    @Marie: so do I.

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  5. Super to learn more about astronauts' lives. So sorry that the recent space walk by women was canceled because NASA didn't have space suits to fit them...in the news lately, but speaks of very poor planning.

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  6. i didn't know the lady - no fitting outfits. seems silly or not fair? hope they will fix that. ( :

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  7. ...there sure was a lot to learn!

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  8. After having a pasta dinner, I feel like the space suit looks.

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  9. It really is fascinating to read William, life sure is topsy turvy up there!

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  10. Much has been learned about life in space. I wonder how much further they can go?

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  11. Wouldn't it be fantastic to be out there in space?

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  12. Great post and photos about aerospace ~ ^_^

    Happy Days to you,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  13. Can you imagine wearing that suit? One time I watched a live feed of them doing work outside the station wearing those suits. I don't know how they are able to move but they get the job done.

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  14. It's fascinating. I'd be afraid to go.

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  15. Das ist alles sehr interessant aber ich möchte das nicht machen müssen.

    Noke

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  16. It's all very fascinating to thinks about space living.

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  17. Going in space is one thing I have no desire to do. I don't even like going over bridges. So, I'm glad this is someone's line of work. I suspect what they do is very important.

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  18. @Barbara: you'd think they of all people would be more organized.

    @Beth: that was an egg on the face moment.

    @Tom: that is true.

    @Maywyn: hah!

    @Grace: that it is.

    @Red: for the moment, anyway, we're not getting much further than we have, aside from probes, which don't have to worry with health effects from years in space.

    @Sandi: and yet most of us will never know.

    @Carol: thank you!

    @Maria: thanks!

    @Sharon: I get the impression that everything is done slower.

    @Jennifer: I'd love to see things from up there.

    @RedPat: definitely.

    @Noke: thank you.

    @Bill: it is, yes.

    @Jeanie: I agree that it is.

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  19. OlderSon did a big school project about the CanadArm. I think we still have all the newspaper cuttings and scientific info pasted into a big binder. All part of history now.

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  20. I cannot imagine life without gravity. It does not appeal to me. :-)

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  21. I found this post and the previous one fascinating. I’ve read some about the different space food and the experiments the astronauts do, but Really never gave a thought to the small everyday things for which adjustments must be made ...ordinary hygiene and exercise to compensate for lack of gravity for instance. Thanks for being such a great virtual guide as always; I’ll check back for the continuation.

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  22. Quite fascinating …

    All the best Jan

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